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Introducing Edo Castle!

This video, titled “Edo Castle / Tokyo Imperial Palace in 1871 江戸城,” was produced by “LIT esperan.” It introduces Edo Castle through old photography.

Edo Castle is said to be the “Number One” castle in Japan due to its size, the height of its castle tower, and the large dimensions of the palace.
This article introduces the history of, and tourist spots around, Edo Castle ruins. Be sure to follow along with the video!

Edo Castle existed until the Meiji Era (1868-1912), and so there are many photographs of it that still exist to this day.
Before we go any further, take a second to look at the once magnificent appearance of Edo Castle in the video.

Edo Castle: History

Edo Castle was a hirayama-style castle, built by Ota Dokan, a retainer of the Ogigayatsu Uesugi family, in 1457.
Years later, Toyotomi Hideyoshi surrendered the castle, and during the Edo period (1603-1868), Tokugawa Ieyasu added to and renovated it.
As a result, it became the largest castle in Japan.

After it was used as the government center of the Tokugawa shogunate, it was handed over to the new Meiji era government in the 1st year of the Meiji Era (1868), and became the imperial palace in the 2nd year of the Meiji Era.
This was referred to as “The Surrender of Edo Castle,” and “The Bloodless Fall of Edo.”
In 1888, it became the Imperial Palace Castle, and in 1948 it was renamed as to "Tokyo Imperial Palace."
Today, a section of the ruins of Edo Castle is still in use as the residence of the Emperor.

The Places Related to Edo Castle in the Video

Image of Fujimi-yagura
Photo:Fujimi-yagura

At the beginning of the video, a blue sky appears in the middle of Tokyo's skyscrapers.
This is the center of the castle called the inner compound, and outside of that is the outer compound.
You can see Asakusa Honganji, Sensoji Temple, Sakuradamon, Toranomon, Fujimi-yagura Ruins, Suidobashi, Shin-O'hashi, Sumida River, Hibiyamon, Asakusabashimon, Honmaru Otemon, Sakashita Gate, and Nishinomaru Nijyubashi from 0:38 in the video. These are popular spots that are well known even in the present day and are introduced through old photographs in the video.

During the middle of the video, the last Tokugawa Shogun, Keiki Tokugawa can be seen from 2:05 and from 1:33, old maps showing the vicinity of Edo Castle, as well as blueprints of the castle tower, are also shown.

Visiting Edo Castle

Image of Edo Castle
Photo:Around Edo Castle

Edo Castle is located in Tokyo's Chiyoda Ward and is about a 5-minute walk from JR Tokyo Station and Otemachi Station on the Tokyo Metro and Toei Subway lines.

Parts of the Honmaru/Ninomaru/Sannomaru of Edo Castle are open to the public as the East Gardens of the Imperial Palace.
Kitanomaru, is now Kitanomaru Park, and many people come here as tourists or joggers. The castle tower has been rebuilt 3 times, however, it was burned down and the plans for rebuilding it have stopped after the rebuilding of the tenshudai (the stone base).
The remaining Edo Castle tenshudai can be seen even in the present day.

When you visit the Imperial Palace, be sure to check out the O-bansho near the palace gates, the magnificent stone walls, the ruins of Matsu corridor, located in the inner palace, famous for its depiction in the story Chusingura. We also recommend going to see the inner palace, the ruins of Wadakuramon, the Sekishitsu (stone burial chamber), and the ruins of Chujakumon.
There is also a guided tour to see the Imperial palace, so try to participate in this if you can.

Summary of Edo Castle

Image of Edo Castle
Photo:Edo Castle

This video, “Edo Castle / Tokyo Imperial Palace in 1871 江戸城,” introduces many photos of Edo Castle from the beginning of the Meiji Era.

You can also visit the Imperial Palace by submitting an application to the Imperial Household Agency.
For more information, please visit the Imperial Household Agency's website.
Edo Castle boasts the largest castle in Japan in terms of size, construction period, and height of the castle tower.

Hopefully after reading this article introducing the history and tourist attractions of Edo Castle, we've piqued your interest in the historical location.

【Tripadvisor】The East Gardens of the Imperial Palace(Edo Castle Ruins)
https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g1066443-d320625-Reviews-The_East_Gardens_of_the_Imperial_Palace_Edo_Castle_Ruin-Chiyoda_Tokyo_Tokyo_Prefe.html

Written By
Sep. 15, 2020
Japan
ひろ(HIRO)
I'm a writer who likes to eat good food wherever I go
The History of Edo Castle: The Number One Castle in Japan! Learn About the Historical Building, Seen in Many Old Photographs, Standing Majestically in the Center of Tokyo
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