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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Dec. 13, 2021
[English/Japanese] Yesterday, the Kanji characters representing Japan for this year were announced. This event is held every year. Incidentally, this year's kanji was "gold. Why do you think this kanji was chosen? The reason lies in the fact that the Olympic Games were held in Tokyo this year. Japan won more gold medals than any other country in history, which is why they chose this kanji. So what else was popular this year? Let's take a look at Japanese culture through what was popular this year. Maritozzo Maritozzo is a pastry that originated in Rome, Italy. It is a round loaf of bread with a lot of cream in between, and is eaten as breakfast in Italy. This year, Maritozzo has become a big hit in Japan. Many cafes and convenience stores lined up their stores with Maritozzo, and many people queued up to buy Maritozzo. In Japan, it is not uncommon for sweets from other countries to become popular in this way. For example, last year it was tapioca from Taiwan, and before that, macarons from France. It is said that Japan is an island nation with a strong desire to learn about the cultures of other countries. Perhaps this is reflected in the food we eat. Movie Box Office Revenue In this year's global box office ranking, live-action movies from China and the U.S. are ranked from first to fifth. So, is it the same for Japan? The Japanese box-office ranking is completely different from the global ranking. From first to fifth place, all live-action movies are based on anime or manga. Last year, the anime "Demon Slayer" rewrote the top spot in the all-time box office ranking. Although there are many teenagers who visit theaters, there is not that big a difference in the age of the audience. This means that people of all ages are watching anime movies. That is how widespread anime and manga are as a culture in Japan. The Real Two-Way / Showtime The words "real two-faced" and "showtime" were nominated as buzzwords this year. These two words refer to Shohei Ohtani, who is active in the American big leagues. In this way, words related to baseball players are often chosen as buzzwords. When it comes to sports in Japan, many foreigners think of sumo wrestling. However, few people know that baseball is actually the most popular sport in Japan. When I tell this to foreign students, they often say, "I thought soccer was more popular than sumo." Do you share the same opinion? In this article, I introduced some of the things that were popular in Japan this year. I would like to continue introducing them in the next issue. By the way, our school holds an event to introduce what is popular in our country. It is a good opportunity to learn about the trends in different countries and to understand different cultures. Please let us know what's popular in your country. Yesterday, the kanji for this year's Japan were announced. This event is held every year. By the way, this year's kanji was "gold". Why do you think this kanji was chosen? The reason is that the Olympic Games were held in Tokyo this year. Japan won the most gold medals in history, so it became this kanji. So what else was trendy this year? Let's get in touch with the culture of Japan from what was popular this year. Maritozzo Maritozzo is a sweet that originated in Rome, Italy. It is made with plenty of cream sandwiched between round breads and is eaten as breakfast in Italy. This Maritozzo has become a big boom in Japan this year. Maritozzo was lined up in many cafes and convenience stores, and many people lined up to buy Maritozzo. It is not uncommon for sweets from other countries to become popular in Japan in this way. For example, tapioca from Taiwan last year and French macarons before that. It is said that Japan is an island country and has a strong desire to learn about the cultures of other countries. This may be reflected in food. Movie box office Looking at this year's world box office rankings, Chinese and American live-action films are ranked from 1st to 5th. So is it the same with Japan? Japan's box office rankings are completely different from world rankings. Surprisingly, from 1st to 5th place, all are live-action movies based on anime and manga. Last year, the anime "Demon Slayer" broke the first place in the all-time box office ranking. Movie theater users may be among their teens, but there is not much difference by age. This means that people of all ages are watching animated movies. It can be said that anime and manga have permeated as a culture in such a Japan. Real Dual-wielding/Showtime This year's buzzwords "Real Dual-wielding" and "Showtime" were nominated. These two words refer to Shohei Ohtani who is active in the American major leagues. In this way, words about baseball players are often chosen as buzzwords. Many foreigners think of sumo wrestling as a sport in Japan. However, few people know that baseball is actually a sport that is often seen in Japan. When I told this story to international students, they said, "I thought soccer would be more popular if it was anything other than sumo," and "I don't know much about what kind of sport baseball is." I answer. Do you all agree with me? This time, we have introduced some of the things that have become popular in Japan this year. I would like to continue to introduce it next time. By the way, at our school, we hold events to introduce what we do in our own country. It is a good opportunity to learn about the trends of various countries and understand different cultures. Please tell us what is popular in your country.
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Dec. 6, 2021
[English/Japanese] Can we see Japan from the contents of Japanese people's bags? The contents of Japanese people's bags. Continuing on from the previous article, I would like to introduce some of the things you can see in Japanese people's bags, such as their lifestyle and culture. 1) Cosmetics and hair elastics Compared to other countries, Japanese women are said to reapply their makeup more often. Have you ever felt that many women fix their makeup when they go to the bathroom? Also, women with long hair may have hair elastics in their bags. This is because when eating noodles such as ramen, it is against etiquette not to tie your hair up. Let's all be careful when eating noodles. 2) Sweets Many people carry snacks in their bags for when they get hungry. I think this is common in many countries. However, in Osaka and other parts of Kansai, there is a unique culture regarding sweets (especially candies). According to a TV program, 10% of people in Tokyo have candies in their bags, while more than 80% of people in Osaka have candies in their bags. There are many episodes of strangers from Osaka (especially older women) talking to you and giving you candies. There are many reasons for this, but Osaka is a city of commerce and communication is very important. For this reason, handing out candies is said to be one of the ways of communication. 3) Fans(sensu) Fans are a popular souvenir. Many people carry them in their bags during the summer. In the past few years, handy fans have become popular, and I have seen many people wearing them around their necks. However, handy fans are large in size and require batteries. In comparison, fans(sensu) are very compact and easy to store in a bag, so they are still very popular. Fans come in a variety of patterns and can be purchased at 100 yen stores. Please try using them not only as souvenirs, but also in your daily life. Extra: Stuffed animals Japanese people are said to be overworked. The daily commute is packed with trains, and the stress is just too much. I've heard that more and more people are putting cute stuffed animals in their bags to relax for a while. It is said that if you gently touch the stuffed animal in your bag when you are sitting on the train, you will feel less stressed. In Japan, a lot of stuffed animals with characters such as Kitty and Pokemon are sold. You should definitely try to find your favorite stuffed animal. Have you had a chance to learn about the life of Japanese people? By the way, our school has a dormitory on the floor above the school, so you don't have to stress about commuting in the morning and can concentrate on your studies. We also offer online school explanations, so please feel free to contact us. Can you see the Japan from the contents of Japan's bag? ② Continuing from the previous article, I would like to introduce the life and culture of Japan that can be seen from the contents of the bags of Japan people. (1) Cosmetics and hair elastics Compared to other countries Japan it is said that women have to fix their makeup more often. Have you ever felt that many women fix their makeup when they go to the bathroom? Also, women with long hair may have a hair elastic in their bag. That's because when eating noodles such as ramen, it is a violation of manners if you do not tie your hair. Let's all be careful when eating noodles. (2) Sweets Many people put sweets in their bags when they are hungry. I think this is common to all countries. However, in Kansai, such as Osaka, there is a unique culture regarding this confectionery (especially candy). According to one TV program, 10% of people in Tokyo carry candy in their bags, while more than 80% of people in Osaka carry candy. It is common to hear episodes where people in Osaka (especially elderly women) who do not know talk to them and give them candy. There are many reasons for this, but Osaka is a city of commerce and values communication. Therefore, it is said that handing out candy is one of the ways of communication. (3) Fan A fan that is also popular as a souvenir. Many people keep it in their bags in the summer. Handy fans have been all the rage in the last few years, and I've seen a lot of people hanging them around their necks. However, in the case of a handy fan, the size is also large and requires batteries. In comparison, fans are very compact and easy to put in a bag, so they are still very popular. Fans come in a variety of patterns and can be purchased at 100 yen shops. Please try using it not only as a souvenir, but also on a regular basis. Extra Stuffed Animal Japan people who are said to be overworked. The daily commute is stressful with crowded trains. I have heard that the number of people who put cute stuffed animals in their bags has increased recently, wanting to heal even a little time in such days. When you can sit on the train, you can gently touch the stuffed animal in your bag to relieve stress. Japan, many of the characters such as Kitty and Pokémon are sold. Please try to find your favorite stuffed animal. Japan have you been able to get to know people's lives? By the way, our school has a dormitory on the upper floor of the school, so you can concentrate on your studies without stress on your morning commute. We also offer online school explanations, so please feel free to contact us.
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Nov. 29, 2021
[English/Japanese] Can we see Japan through the contents of Japanese people's bags?1) What do Japanese people carry in their bags? I would like to introduce you to the life and culture of Japan through this. 1)Wallets Compared to other countries, Japanese people probably carry more cash in their wallets. Although electronic payments have been increasing recently, there are still many stores that do not accept electronic settlements or credit cards. Keep a little extra cash in your wallet when you are living in Japan. 2)Folding umbrella What percentage of chance of precipitation do you take an umbrella with you? Half of Japanese people carry an umbrella even when the chance of precipitation is 30%. 3) Hand cream and eye drops It is very dry in winter in Japan. When you try to open a door, you may feel static electricity, which can be painful. Also, contacts tend to dry out in winter. For this reason, I use hand cream and eye drops to prevent them from drying out. 4) Eco bag In Japan, plastic bags have been charged since last year. As a result, more and more people are carrying eco-bags. 5) Anti-infection goods To prevent infection by the new coronavirus, more and more people are carrying a small size disinfectant. Some people also carry spare masks in their mask cases. Recently, fashionable mask cases are being sold and are being adopted as a new fashion. It would be nice if we could have fun while preventing infection. I will continue to introduce the contents of Japanese people's bags next week. Can you see the Japan from the contents of Japan's bag? ① What do Japan people carry in their bags? From there, I would like to introduce life and culture in Japan. (1) Wallet Probably more cash in your wallet than in other countries. Recently, electronic payments have increased, but there are still many stores that cannot perform electronic settlement or do not accept credit cards. When living in Japan, put in a little more. (2) Folding umbrella Do you take an umbrella with what percentage of the probability of precipitation? Even if there is a 30% chance of rain for Japan people, half of the people carry umbrellas. (3) Hand cream and eye drops Winters in Japan are very dry. If you try to open the door, static electricity will occur, and it may hurt. In addition, contacts are also easy to dry in winter. Therefore, hand creams and eye drops prevent dryness. (4) Eco-bags In Japan, plastic bags have been charged since last year. Therefore, more and more people carry eco-bags. (5) Infectious disease control goods In order to prevent infection with the new coronavirus, more and more people are carrying small size disinfectants. In addition, some people carry spare masks inside their mask cases. Recently, fashionable mask cases have been sold and are being adopted as a new fashion. I hope you can enjoy infection prevention. Next week, I will introduce the contents of Japan people's bags.
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Nov. 15, 2021
[English/Japanese] This time, I'd like to continue my introduction to manners. This time, it's about manners when using leisure facilities. Manners at amusement parks At our Japanese language school, we have field trips several times a year. The locations include amusement parks, zoos, and other facilities. For this reason, we go over the precautions in class before the field trip. In this article, I would like to introduce some of these precautions. Tattoos are more common among international students compared to Japanese. Many leisure facilities in Japan refuse to accept people with visible tattoos. At one Japanese language school, there was a case where a student was not allowed to enter the facility because they did not check beforehand. Some facilities will allow you to enter if you are invisible, so you may want to carry a jacket even in the summer. However, this is not possible in the case of swimming pools, so give up using the facilities. Also, many places prohibit taking pictures using selfie sticks and live streaming of social networking sites. Be sure to check the precautions beforehand before you go. Onsen(hot spring)Manners It is difficult for even Japanese people to understand all the rules and manners of hot springs and public baths. For this reason, I often hear from international students that they have yet to try them because it seems too difficult to know how to enter. So what kind of rules and manners are there in onsen and sento? The first thing you must do before entering an onsen is to take a "kakeyu," which means to pour hot water on your body to remove dirt from your body before entering the onsen. There are also other things to keep in mind when washing your body. In hot spring facilities, the chairs used for washing your body are shared. Be sure to wash the chair well before putting it away when you are done using it. Also, women should tie their hair up when they enter the onsen. Do not put anything other than your body in the hot spring. The same goes for towels. Leave your towel in the luggage area or put it on your head. If it is your first time in a hot spring, be careful not to stay in the hot spring too long. If you are not used to hot springs, you may get sick. Hydrate frequently while bathing. Even Japanese people sometimes forget the detailed rules, so most onsen facilities have written instructions on how to enter the onsen. There are also YouTube videos that show you how to get in and out of the onsen, so please check them out. Manners in the Park Lastly, I would like to introduce the manners of the parks that are closest to us. I often hear foreigners talking about how parks in Japan are not very free. There are sometimes foreign students who get into trouble in the parks, so it is important to learn park manners as well. One of the most common problems I hear about is foreign students taking fruits and nuts from trees planted in the park. The trees and flowers planted in the park basically belong to the park, so you should not take them home. There are also many people who break the branches of cherry trees during the cherry blossom season. There is a Japanese proverb that says, “Fools who cut cherry trees. Fools who do not cut plum trees." If you cut off an important branch of a cherry tree, it may start to rot. Never cut cherry blossoms, no matter how beautiful they are. Also, I am sometimes asked by students if they can play soccer with their friends in the park. In most parks, you are not allowed to use a ball. Therefore, if you want to play soccer, you need to make a reservation at a local ground. For more information, ask your school teacher or a Japanese person close to you. These are just a few of the things I introduced here. Please be sure to check the website of any leisure facilities you wish to use. Our school offers related classes before and after the field trip. It is a popular way for students to deepen their understanding of Japan, not only by playing but also by learning. I hope that everyone will try to learn about Japanese culture from various places in Japan. This time, I will continue to introduce manners as before. This time it is manners when using leisure facilities. Amusement park manners The Japanese school conducts field trips several times a year. Locations include amusement parks, zoos, and other facilities. Therefore, we will check the precautions during class before the field trip. In this article, we will introduce some of the precautions. Tattoos are more common among international students than among Japan people. Many leisure facilities in Japan refuse people who have tattoos where they can see them. In one Japanese school, students were not allowed into the facility because they did not check in advance. If you can't see it, some facilities allow you to enter the park, so it may be a good idea to bring a jacket even in summer. However, in the case of a pool, this is not possible, so give up using the facilities. In addition, many places prohibit taking photos using selfie sticks and live streaming on SNS. Be sure to check the precautions in advance before going. Onsen manners It is difficult for even Japan people to understand all the rules and manners of hot springs and public baths. For this reason, I often hear from international students that they have not yet been able to take on the challenge because it seems difficult to get in. So, what kind of rules and manners are there in hot springs and public baths? First of all, what you need to do before entering the hot spring is "kakeyu". "Kakeyu" is a hot water that is poured on the body for the purpose of removing dirt from the body before entering the hot spring. It also means getting your body used to the hot water by doing "kakeyu". There are other points to be aware of when washing your body. At the hot spring facility, the chairs used to wash the body are shared. When you're done using it, be sure to wash the chair thoroughly before putting it away. Also, if you are a woman, you should tie your hair when you enter the onsen. Please be careful not to get anything other than your body in the hot spring. It's the same with towels. Leave your towel in the luggage storage area or put it on your head. If you are entering a hot spring for the first time, please be careful not to soak in the hot spring for too long. Some people sometimes get sick if they are not used to hot springs. Drink water frequently while bathing. Even Japan people may forget the detailed rules, so most hot spring facilities have precautions for how to enter. Also, some of them are published on YouTube, etc., so please take a look. Park manners Finally, I would like to introduce the manners of the park that is closest to us. I often hear foreigners say that there is little freedom in Japan parks. There are international students who sometimes cause trouble in the park, so be sure to learn the manners of the park. One of the problems I often hear about international students is taking nuts and fruits from trees planted in parks. The trees and flowers planted in the park are basically from the park, so do not take them home. In addition, many people break the branches of the cherry blossoms when the cherry blossom season comes. There is a Japan proverb that says, "An idiot who cuts cherry blossoms, an idiot who does not cut plums." If you cut off an important branch of a cherry tree, it may start to rot from there. Never cut it, no matter how clean it is. Also, students sometimes ask me if I want to play soccer with my friends but can play it at the park. Most parks are not allowed to use balls. Therefore, if you want to play soccer, you need to make a reservation for a local ground. For details, please ask your school teacher or a Japan close to you. These are just a few. When using leisure facilities, please be sure to check in advance. At our school, we offer classes related to before and after field trips. You can not only play, but also learn, so it is popular that it deepens your understanding of Japan. I hope you will learn about Japan culture from various places in the Japan.
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Nov. 8, 2021
[English/Japanese] In this issue, I would like to introduce you to some of the things that you should not do in Japan. There are things that you may have done without knowing it, but that even foreigners are not allowed to do. How many of Japan's unique cultures do you know? Gift Giving Etiquette There are two numbers that are frowned upon in Japan: 4 and 9. 4 is pronounced "shi" and 9 is pronounced "ku" in Japanese. "Shi" means "death" and "9" means "suffering", so anything with "ku" and "shi" in it is frowned upon in many situations. For example, "comb" is not allowed to be sent as a gift because it has a bad meaning. In addition to this, there are a few other gifts that should not be sent. For example, a plant in a pot should not be sent to a person in the hospital. A plant in a pot has roots. This is because it can be taken to mean that the plant will have roots in the hospital, meaning that the illness will last longer. If you want to give flowers to someone who is in the hospital, use cut flowers instead of potted plants. However, even cut flowers such as chrysanthemums, which are used for funerals, are considered rude, so be careful. Also, do not send a handkerchief as a wedding gift. Why is this? Because handkerchiefs are associated with tears. Other items that can be broken, such as china and mirrors, are also considered bad luck. Similarly, for housewarming gifts, lighters and ashtrays should not be sent because they remind people of fire. These are just a few examples. If you are going to give a gift to a Japanese person, you need to find out beforehand if it would be a rude gift. Dining Manners Your country also has various manners for eating. I have heard manners such as never using your left hand when eating curry from Nepalese students at our school. So, what kind of manners do we have in Japan for eating? In Japan, we use chopsticks when we eat. Chopsticks are difficult to use, but their manners are also complicated. For example, the worst thing you can do is to use two chopsticks to hold your food. The reason why this is not allowed is because it is the same act as placing the bones of a deceased person in an urn at a Buddhist funeral. (*Not talking about chopsticks, but putting the right collar of the kimono on top of the left collar is the same as wearing the kimono of the deceased, so you have to be careful. ) There are many other manners of chopsticks that should not be practiced, such as "stabbing chopsticks" and "yose-chopsticks". In addition to chopsticks, it is also bad manners to eat rice without holding the bowl, or to put your elbows on the table. However, if you think about it too much, it will be difficult to eat a good meal. I recommend that you learn at least the minimum manners for eating, and then gradually get used to them. Superstitions How many superstitions do you know about in Japan? The first one is the "north pillow". The first one is "north pillow", which means that you should not sleep with your pillow in the north, because it is related to Buddhism and there is a theory that putting your pillow in the north means death. Second, don't cut your nails at night. There is a superstition that if you cut your nails at night, you will die before your parents do. One reason is that nails are the place where a person's "soul" is located, so they must be taken care of. Another reason is that in the days when there was little light, cutting nails at night would cause injury. The third is "don't whistle at night." In Japan, there is a saying that whistling attracts spiritual things. This spirituality includes not only good things, but also bad things, so there is a theory that it is dangerous to whistle at night, when spirituality is more active. The three I've mentioned so far are all things you shouldn't do, but I'll end with a superstition that has a good meaning. The last superstition that has a good meaning is "If a pillar of tea stands, good luck will come. A pillar of tea means that the stems of the tea in the teacup stand up like a pillar when the tea is made. For Japanese people, a "pillar" has a powerful impression as something that supports a house. (A recent popular manga often features a "pillar [Hahira]”) For this reason, the tea pillar is known as a good omen. Incidentally, I have heard from Mongolian students that there is a superstition that if a pillar of tea stands, relatives will come to your house. In different countries, superstitions have completely different meanings, don't they? I hope you now have a better understanding of manners. In the next article, I will introduce manners at leisure facilities. This time, I will introduce "what not to do in Japan". Even if you don't know it, there are things that you can't forgive because you're a foreigner. How many unique cultures do you know of Japan? Gift etiquette There are figures that are hated in Japan. 4 and 9. 4 is pronounced as Japanese, "shi" and 9 as "ku". Since "shi" means "death" and "9" means "suffering", things with "ku" and "shi" in the words are disliked in various situations. For example, "comb" is a gift that has a bad meaning, so it is not allowed to be sent. There are a few other gifts you shouldn't send. For example, plants in pots should not be sent to people who are in the hospital. The plant in the pot has roots. This is because it is taken as the meaning of being rooted in a hospital, that is, the meaning of prolonged illness. If you want to give flowers to someone who is in the hospital, cut flowers instead of potted plants. However, be careful not to use cut flowers such as "chrysanthemums" used for funerals, as they will be rude. Also, if it is a wedding gift, do not send a handkerchief. Why? Because handkerchiefs are associated with tears. In addition, crackable objects such as pottery and mirrors are also considered unlucky. In the case of housewarming, lighters and ashtrays should not be sent because they are reminiscent of fire. These are just a few. If you are going to give something to Japan someone, you need to research it in advance to see if it will be a rude gift. Dining etiquette Your country also has various dining etiquette. I have heard from Nepalese students at our school that they never use their left hand when eating curry. So, what kind of dining etiquette is there in Japan? In Japan, chopsticks are used when eating. Chopsticks are difficult to use, but their manners are also complicated. For example, the last thing you should do is hold one food with chopsticks for two people. The reason why this should not be done is because it is the same act as placing the bones of a deceased person in an urn at a Buddhist funeral. (* I'm not talking about chopsticks, but you have to be careful if the collar of the kimono is in front of the right, because it will be the same as the kimono worn by the deceased.) In addition to this, there are many other acts that should not be done, such as "embroidery chopsticks" to embroider food and "chopsticks" to pull plates together. It is also bad manners to eat rice without holding a bowl in addition to chopsticks, or to elbow yourself on the table. However, if you think about it too much, it will be difficult to eat delicious rice. We recommend that you learn the minimum manners of your meals and gradually get used to them. superstition How many superstitions do you know about Japan? Here are some of them. The first is the "North Pillow". There is a theory that you should not sleep with a pillow in the north, which is related to Buddhism, and that placing a pillow in the north means "death". The second is "do not cut your nails at night." There is a superstition that if you cut your nails at night, you will die faster than your parents. There is a theory about this, but there is a teaching that nails must be cherished because they are the place where the person's "soul" is, and there are reasons that in an era when there was little light, cutting nails at night would injure you. The third is "Do not whistle at night." There is a Japan tradition that whistling attracts spiritual things. There is a theory that this spiritual thing contains not only good things, but also bad things, so whistling is dangerous at night when spiritual things are active. The three things I've introduced so far are all things you shouldn't do, but here are some good and meaningful superstitions at the end. It is "good luck comes when the tea pillar stands". A tea pillar is a tea stalk that stands like a pillar in a teacup when tea is brewed. For Japan people, "pillars" have a powerful impression as they support the house. (Recently, popular manga often have "pillars.") Therefore, tea pillars are known as auspicious. By the way, I have heard from Mongolian students that there is a superstition that "relatives come to the house when the tea pillar is erected." Different countries have completely different meanings of superstition. Do you understand manners? Next time, we will introduce manners at leisure facilities.
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Nov. 1, 2021
[English/Japan] Things that surprised foreign students when they came to Japan. ~Fashion (2) Continuing from last week, this week I would like to introduce the fashion of Japanese people. Mysterious message written on a T-shirt One of the most famous Japanese fashion items that made foreign tourists and international students laugh was the English logo T-shirts. An English logo T-shirt is a T-shirt with English stylishly written on it. Most Japanese people who wear these T-shirts sometimes wear them just because they are "fashionable" or "cool" without thinking about the meaning of the English written on them. However, the content of the English written on them is often strange, and they are sometimes laughed at by English-speaking foreigners. One person told me that when she was standing in line at the checkout counter after shopping at a supermarket, the staff member (a Japanese woman in her 50s or 60s) was wearing a T-shirt with "born in L. A." written in large letters on it, and she had a hard time holding back her laughter. However, this is not only Japanese. Some Western tourists also wear T-shirts (and tattoos) with strange kanji characters. However, this is not the case with international students who are learning Kanji. Let's all study Japanese and try to read the kanji on the T-shirts properly. The More Natural the Makeup, the More Time Japanese Spend on It Many foreigners are surprised to see Japanese women applying makeup in the restroom or even on a shaky train. Compared to other countries, Japanese women are famous for wearing makeup more often. Japanese makeup is characterized by a heavy application of foundation and a focus on eye makeup. However, all of these are not flashy makeup; the emphasis is on how to make it look natural. Also, since they started wearing masks due to the influence of Corona, more and more people have started to be particular about their eye makeup. Furthermore, cosmetics for men have recently been marketed and are very popular. It is now commonplace for high school boys to trim their eyebrows, which was rare a few years ago. Japanese makeup products are also popular overseas, and many people take them as souvenirs. I hope you will give them a try too. Regional differences in fashion I've written before about regional differences in the Japanese personality, but there are also regional differences in fashion. For example, even in Tokyo, Marunouchi is an office district, so many people wear stylish suits. Harajuku is also known as the fashion district, with people walking around in unique fashions such as Lolita and punk. In Osaka, many people like to wear very flashy patterns such as leopard print, and in Nagoya, it is said that many people wear brands. In areas where there are many people, fashion also varies. Of course, there are trends, but no matter what kind of fashion you wear, it is unlikely that people will look at you strangely. Please enjoy Japan in your own way and in the fashion you like. Have you learned a little about Japanese fashion? Our school holds an event to wear Yukata (summer kimono) before the summer vacation. I'm sure you'll love these yukata, so airy and with great patterns! What surprised international students when they came to Japan. ~Fashion(2)~ This week, continuing from last week, I would like to introduce the fashion of Japan people. Mysterious message written on the T-shirt One of the most famous fashion for Japan people who made foreign tourists and international students laugh is the English logo T-shirt. An English logo T-shirt is a T-shirt with English written stylishly on the T-shirt. Most Japan people who wear this T-shirt wear it only with the image of "fashionable" and "cool" without thinking about the meaning of the English written on it. However, many of the English contents written there are strange, and foreigners in English-speaking countries sometimes laugh at them. One person said that when he was shopping at a supermarket and was standing in line at the cash register, the cashier staff (Japan women in their 50s ~ 60s) was wearing a T-shirt with the words "born in L.A." written in large letters, and it was difficult to hold back her laughter. But this applies only to Japan people. Western tourists may also wear T-shirts (tattoos, etc.) with strange Chinese characters. However, this is not the case for international students who are learning kanji. Everyone, let's study Japanese and read the kanji on the T-shirt properly. People who spend as much time as natural makeup Japan Many foreigners are surprised to see Japan women fixing their makeup in the toilet and putting on makeup even on a swaying train. Japan women are notorious for wearing makeup more often than in other countries. Japan people's makeup is characterized by applying foundation well and sticking to eye makeup. However, these are all emphasized not on flashy makeup, but on how natural it looks. Also, since they started wearing masks due to the influence of Corona, it seems that the number of people who are particular about eye makeup has increased. More recently, men's cosmetics have also been on sale and are popular. It is now commonplace for high school boys to trim their eyebrows, which was rare a few years ago. Japan's makeup products are very popular overseas, and many people take them as souvenirs. Please give it a try. Regional differences in fashion I previously wrote in a column that there are regional differences in the personality of Japan people, but there are also regional differences in fashion. For example, even in Tokyo, Marunouchi is an office district, so there are many people wearing stylish suits. Harajuku is also said to be a fashion town, and there are people with unique fashions such as Lolita and punk walking around. It is said that many people in Osaka prefer to wear very flashy patterns such as leopard prints, and many people wear brands in Nagoya. In areas where there are many people, fashion also varies. Of course, there are trends, but in any fashion you are unlikely to be seen strangely by people. Please enjoy Japan in your own fashion and your favorite fashion. Did you get to know a little about Japan fashion? Our school holds an event to wear a yukata (summer kimono) before the summer vacation. I'm sure you'll love yukatas with good ventilation and nice patterns!
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Oct. 19, 2021
[English/Japanese] Things that surprised foreign students when they came to Japan. ~Fashion Foreigners who come to Japan for the first time (both tourists and international students) often wonder what kind of fashion they should wear during their stay in Japan. Therefore, I would like to introduce some episodes about Japanese fashion. Japanese who don't wear well-fitting clothes What surprises foreigners who travel to Japan in summer is that Japanese people wear oversized clothes even in summer. Foreigners, especially Westerners, tend to wear T-shirts or running clothes on top and short pants on the bottom. So why do Japanese people wear oversized clothes? It has to do with the heat and humidity of the Japanese summer. Summer in Japan is humid and hot. Therefore, wearing tight-fitting clothes can cause skin problems due to steaminess. Oversized clothes are chosen because they are well ventilated and functional, which helps to eliminate steaminess. Foreigners who enjoy summer vacations in Japan sometimes develop skin problems after a while and rush to buy new clothes. If you are coming to Japan in the summer, be sure to keep this in mind when choosing your clothes. he Aesthetics of Hiding In summer, more and more female students at Japanese language schools wear revealing clothes, but this is mostly the first-year students. However, this is mostly the case for first-year students; second-year students, like Japanese, do not expose their skin as much. So why do Japanese people not expose their skin so much even in summer? In Japan, showing skin or anything that is considered "sexy" in other countries is often seen as "vulgar". For this reason, Japanese women seem to be childish to foreigners. In Japan, there has always been an "aesthetic of concealment," which means not showing everything to others so that they can imagine your beauty. Also, in Japan, there is a culture of "kawaii," or childishness, which gives a good impression. This trend is slowly changing these days, but it still persists. The Unique Fashion of High School Girls One thing that has nothing to do with the "hidden aesthetic" is the fashion of high school girls. Most high school girls in Japan wear a uniform designated by the school. Most Japanese high school girls wear school uniforms, and they are passionate about how to make their uniforms look cute. A typical example is the length of the skirt. They wear short skirts even in the middle of winter in order to make their legs look longer and more beautiful. I heard a male exchange student say, "This is great because we don't have high school students like that in my country! Be careful not to look too much or you will get caught by the police. They also like brand-name items, and even high school students sometimes have high-brand purses and bags. Some of these items are given to them as gifts by their boyfriends, but they also work hard and have part-time jobs to buy them. That is how desperate Japanese high school girls are for fashion. What do you think? I will continue to introduce Japanese fashion in my next article. I will not be able to talk next week due to circumstances. What surprised international students when they came to Japan. ~Fashion~ Foreigners (both tourists and international students) who come to Japan for the first time often wonder what kind of fashion they should wear during their stay Japan So, from this time, I will introduce some episodes about the fashion of Japan people. Japan people who don't wear fitted clothes What surprises foreigners who come to Japan trip in the summer is that Japan wear oversized clothes even in summer. Foreigners, especially Westerners, often wear T-shirts and running shirts on the top and short pants on the bottom. So why do Japan people wear oversizes? It is related to the "sultry heat" of the summer in Japan. Summer in Japan is humid and sultry. Therefore, if you wear fitted clothes, it will get stuffy and may cause skin problems. Oversized clothes are also chosen for their airiness and functionality, which helps relieve stuffiness. Foreigners who are enjoying a summer vacation in Japan may have skin problems after a while, and may rush to buy new clothes. When you come to Japan in the summer, keep that in mind when choosing clothes. Aesthetics to hide In Japanese schools, more and more girls wear clothes that reveal their skin in the summer. However, this is often the first year of students. Second-year students will no longer expose their skin as well as Japan. So why don't Japan people get much exposure even in summer? In Japan, exposing the skin and what is called "sexy" in foreign countries are often considered "vulgar". Therefore, Japan women seem to feel young from the perspective of foreigners. The Japan has long been called "aesthetics that hide." "Hiding aesthetics" is the idea of letting others imagine beauty by not showing everything. There is also a culture in Japan where young people make a good impression of being cute. This trend has been changing little by little in recent years, but it still persists. Unique fashion of schoolgirls What has nothing to do with "hiding aesthetics" is the fashion of high school girls. Most of the high school students in Japan wear school-designated uniforms. High school girls are passionate about how to make their uniforms look cute. A typical example is the length of the skirt. To make my legs look longer and prettier, I wear skirts short, even in the middle of winter. From male international students, it's the best because there are no such high school students in my country! I've heard you talking. Be careful because if you look at it too much, the police will grab you. They also like branded things, and even high school students sometimes have high-brand wallets and bags. Some of these are gifts from lovers, but not only that, but sometimes you work hard part-time to buy them. So much so that we can say that Japan schoolgirls are desperate for fashion. How was it? Next time, we will continue to introduce Japan fashion. * We will be closed next week due to circumstances.
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Oct. 12, 2021
[English/Japanese] Continuing from last week, I would like to introduce some of the behaviors and conversations that international students find strange when communicating with Japanese people. Shy Japanese? International students often tell me that many Japanese people are shy. When I ask them why, they say that many Japanese do not express their opinions clearly, do not make eye contact, and are shy about dancing or singing in public. Do you think that Japanese people are really shy? In Japan, modesty and mutual respect have long been regarded as virtues. For this reason, I think many Japanese people are careful to avoid doing anything that might draw attention to themselves. However, there is one situation where shy Japanese people can act boldly. One of them is hot springs. International students often say that it is strange that Japanese people are so shy that they show their nakedness to others and take a bath together. They also say the same thing about Japanese people who cosplay at anime events. When it comes to hot springs, the reason given is that it is a part of Japanese culture that they have grown accustomed to, so few Japanese question it. Also, cosplaying is a way to "be someone else," and many people are open to it. ✌ In your country, what kind of poses do you take when taking photos? When you take photos at your Japanese language school, you can discover the differences between countries. For example, male students from Nepal and Bangladesh "wear sunglasses and put their hands in their pockets and hold them at an angle," while female students from Asian countries who like Korean culture "make a heart with their index finger and thumb overlapping. And most Japanese teachers make the "peace sign". There are many theories as to why Japanese people make the peace sign. Some foreign students think that Japanese people are boring when it comes to posing for photos. However, for shy Japanese who feel embarrassed to be true, it may be a relief to have a standard pose. Different Personalities in Different Regions When people talk about the personality of the Japanese, they are often referring to the Japanese living in the Tokyo area. So, are Japanese people in other areas the same as in Tokyo? Osaka is famous for being different from the typical Japanese character. Osaka has prospered as a city of commerce and is home to many people who like to talk and make people laugh. For this reason, I often hear foreign students who have visited Osaka for the first time or who have talked with people from Osaka say that they do not feel like Japanese. Also, being located in the southernmost part of Japan, Okinawa has a large number of people who love to dance and sing. Just like the climate, the people in Okinawa are warm and cheerful. On the other hand, people in colder areas such as Tohoku are more humble and less talkative than those in Tokyo. Even in the same region of Japan, the atmosphere of the people differs depending on the region, so please try talking to Japanese people in different regions. Over the past two weeks, I have introduced the personality and behavior of Japanese people. International students who have just arrived in Japan often have misunderstandings about the behavior of Japanese people. In order to reduce such misunderstandings, Japanese language schools offer classes on Japanese culture as well as on the character of Japanese people. Please come and observe our classes. Continuing from last week, I would like to introduce the actions and conversations that international students thought "Japan people are strange" when communicating with Japan people. Shy Japan? International students often say that many Japan people are shy. When asked why, they say, "I don't express my opinion clearly," "I don't make eye contact," and "I am shy about dancing or singing in public." Do you think Japan people are really shy? It has long been a virtue for Japan to be humble and to give in. Therefore, I think there are many people who are careful not to do anything that attracts Japan attention of themselves. But why would such a shy Japan do such a thing? There are also situations where I have doubts. It is a hot spring. International students often tell me that it is strange to show others their nakedness and take a bath together, even though they are Japan shy. There are also similar opinions about Japan people who cosplay at anime events. When it comes to hot springs, the reason is that few people have doubts about them because they are familiar with Japan Japan culture. Also, cosplay is about "becoming a different you," and many people open up. ✌ What kind of pose do you take when taking photos in your country? Taking photos at Japanese schools allows you to discover differences between countries. Male students from Nepal and Bangladesh "put their hands in their pockets with sunglasses and hold them diagonally," while Asian female students who like Korean culture "put their index fingers and thumbs on top of each other to make a heart." And Japan teachers mostly make a "peace sign". There are theories as to why Japan people do pieces. Some international students find it boring to pose for photos of Japan people. However, for shy Japan who find photography embarrassing, it may be reassuring to have a standard pose. Personality varies by region When talking about the personality of Japan people, most of them are aimed at "Japan people living in the suburbs of Tokyo". So, are Japan people in other regions the same as in Tokyo? Osaka is famous for being different from the typical Japan personality. Osaka is a thriving city of business, and there are many people who like to talk and want to make people laugh. For this reason, I often hear from international students who visit Osaka for the first time or who have spoken with people from Osaka that they are not like Japan people. Also, Okinawa, which is located in the southernmost part of the Japan, has many people who love to dance and sing. Like the climate, the people are warm and cheerful people live here. On the other hand, there is an image that in cold regions such as Tohoku, there are even more humble people and fewer words than in Tokyo. Even in the same Japan, the atmosphere of people differs depending on the region, so please try talking to Japan people from various regions. Over the course of two weeks, we introduced the personalities and behaviors of Japan people. International students who have just arrived at Japan often misunderstand the behavior of Japan others. In Japanese schools, in order to reduce such misunderstandings, the Japan culture and the personality of the Japan person are also dealt with in class. Please come and observe the class.
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  • Tohoku region
  • Okinawa area
  • Japanese heart/Wabisabi
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Oct. 5, 2021
[English/Japanese] Things that Surprised International Students When They Came to Japan: Japanese People's Personalities (1) When I asked international students, "What kind of people did you think the Japanese people were when you were in your home country? " I asked them. They replied, "I thought Japanese people were polite, kind, and serious. But now it's a little different. They replied. So, what do international students think about Japanese people when they come to Japan? This time, I would like to talk about some of the behaviors and conversations that international students find strange when communicating with Japanese people. Social Etiquette This is a story about a Bangladeshi student. There is a Japanese person who I became friends with during break time at my part-time job. I was very happy because I had never made Japanese friends before. The Japanese person said, "Let's have dinner sometime. I was so happy that I asked him when he wanted to eat. Where do you want to eat? I asked. But the Japanese guy laughed and said he would check his schedule and that was the end of the conversation. I waited, wondering when. I waited and waited, but there was no answer at all. I wondered why. If you are Japanese, you may understand this story. When Japanese people say, "Let's eat dinner sometime," it does not mean that they really want to eat. This conversation is a kind of greeting. However, in most cases, it is not a lie from the Japanese to the foreign student, because it is often said when the conversation was enjoyable. It also implies that you might really want to have dinner together when you get to know each other better or when the timing is right. If someone says, "Let's have dinner sometime. If you are asked, "Let's have dinner sometime," you can say, "Sounds good. or "I would like to introduce you to some restaurants in my country, so please let me know when you are free. I'd like to introduce you to some restaurants in my country. What is your blood type? I often get asked by international students, "Why do Japanese people often ask me my blood type? Why is that? There are many international students who do not know their blood type. They also say that almost no one asks people their blood type in everyday conversation. In Japan, "blood type fortune-telling" and "blood type personality tests," which are not common in other countries, are often featured in morning information programs and women's magazines. Type A is serious, Type B is self-centered, Type O is sketchy, and Type AB is mysterious, to name a few of the blood type characteristics that Japanese people believe in. Some Japanese people don't want people to know that their blood type is B because they have a bad impression of it. When I tell this story, the foreign students burst into laughter. You may think it is ridiculous to judge people by their blood type, but it is true that for some Japanese people, it is used as a basis for judging others. If you are asked your blood type by a Japanese person, you may want to reply, "I don't know. Japanese people are quick to apologize A Mongolian student said to me, "Japanese people are quick to apologize. It's strange that they apologize even if it's not their fault. " Japanese people use the word "Sumimasen" a lot in their daily lives. The word "Sumimasen" is mainly used to apologize, but it is also used when you want to thank someone or call out to someone. However, this is not the only reason why Japanese people apologize more often than other countries. It is often said that the reason why Japanese people apologize so often is that they are a nation that is careful not to cause trouble to others. When foreigners see Japanese people apologizing, they think that Japanese people are polite, but at the same time, they sometimes feel as if they are running away from solving problems. However, if you get a job at a Japanese company or work part-time serving customers, you may have problems if you cannot apologize like a Japanese person. There are books on how to apologize, and even movies about it in japan. If you want to work in Japan, learn not only the Japanese language but also how to apologize. What do you think? In the next article, I will continue to tell you about Japanese people's behavior and conversation that international students find strange! What surprised international students when they came to Japan ~ Personalities of Japan people (1) ~ When I asked international students, "What kind of people did you think Japan people were when you were in your country?" they replied, "I thought they were polite, kind, and serious. But now it's a little different." I answer. So, what do international students who come to Japan think about Japan people? This time, we will focus on the behaviors and conversations that international students think "Japan people are strange" when communicating with Japan people. Social Dictatorship The story of a Bangladeshi student. There are Japan people with whom I became friends a little during breaks at my part-time job. It was my first time to have Japan friends, and I was very happy. The Japan said, "Let's eat next time." I was so glad that when to eat? Where to eat? I asked. But the Japan laughed and said, "I'll check the schedule," and that was the end of the story. I wonder when? I was waiting, but there was no reply at all. Why? I think Japan people will understand this story. The Japan person's "Let's eat next time" does not really want to eat. This conversation is like a greeting. However, I often say it when I enjoyed having a conversation, so I have no intention of being rude to international students. And it also means that you might really eat together when you get to know each other more or when the timing is right. If someone says, "Let's eat next time," you say, "That's great." or "I would like to introduce you to a store in my country, so please let me know when you have free time." What is your blood type? International students sometimes ask me, "Why do Japan people often ask me about my blood type?" There are many international students who do not know their blood type. He also says that very few people ask people about their blood type in everyday conversations. In Japan, "blood type fortune telling" and "blood type personality diagnosis", which are not often found in other countries, are often covered in morning information programs and women's magazines. The characteristics of blood types that Japan believe in are that type A is serious, type B is self-centered, type O is rough, type AB is mysterious, etc. Some people who are Japan and have a blood type B don't want others to know because they have a bad impression. When I tell this story, the international students burst out laughing. You may think it's silly to judge people by their blood type, but it's also true that some Japan people use it as a factor in their judgment. When someone Japan you ask you about your blood type, it might be a good idea to answer, "I don't know." Japan people who apologize immediately A Mongolian student told me, "Japan people apologize immediately, and it's strange to apologize even if you're not bad." I have been told. Japan people often use the word "sumimasen" in their daily lives. "Sumimasen" is mainly used to apologize, but it is also used when you want to thank or call out. But that's not all Japan it's true that people apologize more than in other countries. One of the reasons why Japan people frequently apologize is the national trait of being careful not to cause trouble to others. Seeing Japan apologize can also make Japan feel like a foreigner is running away from solving problems, while others think they are polite. However, if you get a job at a Japan company or serve customers part-time Japan problems may arise if you cannot apologize like a person. There are also bookstores on how to apologize, movies about it, etc. If you work in Japan Japanese learn how to apologize as well as the . How was it? Next time, I will tell you about the behavior and conversations of Japan international students who think it is strange!
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  • Japan
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Sep. 28, 2021
[English/Japanese] Things that Surprised Foreign Students When They Came to Japan - Love (2) In this article, I will introduce Japanese people's views on love. 1) The process of becoming a lover In your country, what is the difference between a friend and a lover? In Japan, there are several processes to change from a friend to a lover. In most cases, if you find someone you like, you first ask him/her out on a date. After a few dates, you tell them, "Please be my girlfriend. And if the person says yes, you're in, you become lovers. When I tell this story, some international students say, "This is like asking for marriage! About 30 years ago, many students would write letters asking for a girlfriend, but nowadays, students are confessing their love through social networking sites. It's a bit tedious, but if you want a Japanese lover, try to be aware of this process. 2) Don't feed the fish you catch? I often hear from foreigners that Japanese people are cold to their lovers. Are Japanese people really cold to their lovers? Japanese people are not very good at expressing their feelings straightforwardly, not just to their lovers. For this reason, it is said that they don't often say "I love you" to their lovers. In addition, since they want to have an equal relationship with their lovers, many men and women do not pay more for a meal, but rather split the bill. Also, working people are basically busy, so it is said that they date only once a week. If you just listen to this story, it sounds cold, doesn't it? Japanese people have their own unique expressions of affection. For example, many couples want to feel that they are always together by having a pair of things because they are too busy to see their lover very often. There are many couples who go out to buy a pair of rings, especially when they have just become lovers. I often hear Europe and America students say, "It's strange to wear a pair of rings when you're not engaged." You and your girlfriend or boyfriend should discuss and decide which culture you want to go with. 3) Special events for lovers There are several special events for lovers. There are several special events for lovers, such as each other's birthday, the anniversary of their relationship, Valentine's Day, etc. Among them, Christmas is the one that surprises foreigners. In Japan, Christmas has a strong image of being an event to spend with lovers rather than a family event. Perhaps because of this, around November, people say, "Christmas is only a month away. If I don't get a girlfriend soon, it will be a very lonely Christmas. " Also, In Japanese TV dramas and movies, Christmas is always portrayed as a romantic scene. It is also an important event to introduce your lover to your family. For Japanese people, introducing your lover to your family is when you are willing to marry him/her, so you carefully choose the clothes and souvenirs you will wear on that day. On the other hand, in many other countries, letting your family meet you often does not have such a heavy meaning. Therefore, asking your Japanese lover to "meet your family" may cause misunderstandings between you. Some of them may say, "I don't want to get married yet!" and you may be rejected, so be careful! In this article, I introduced some of the Japanese views on love. Talking about love is one of the most popular topics in class. Please enroll in a Japanese language school and talk about it with people from various countries. What surprised international students when they came to Japan ~ Love (2) ~ This time, I will introduce Japan people's views on love. (1) The process of becoming a lover What is the difference between a friend and a lover in your country? In Japan there are several processes to turn from a friend to a lover. Most of the time, if someone interests you, the first thing you do is ask them out on a date. You go on a few dates, and then tell them, "Please be my lover." And if you get the OK from the other person, you will become lovers. When I talk about this, some international students say, "It's like when I ask you to get married!" About 30 years ago, many students wrote letters asking them to become lovers. By the way, recent students have confessed on SNS. It's a bit troublesome, but if you want to have a lover Japan, please be aware of this process. (2) Do you feed the fish you catch? Japan often hear from foreigners that people are cold to their lovers. Is Japan person really cold to his lover? Japan people are not limited to lovers, and there are few people who tell their feelings straight. Therefore, it is said that they do not often say "I love you" to their lovers in words. Also, since they want their lovers to have an equal relationship, neither men nor women pay too much when eating, and many people split it. Also, working people are basically busy, so it is said that they go on dates about once a week. Hearing this story alone makes you feel cold. Japan person has a Japan person-like expression of affection. For example, there are many couples who are too busy to see their lovers very often, so having a pair makes them feel "always together". Especially many couples who are new to lovers go to buy a pair of rings. I often hear from students in Europe and the United States, "Pair rings are weird even though they are not engaged." Let's decide which culture to go with after a lot of discussion with your lover. (3) Special events between lovers There are several special events between lovers. Each other's birthdays, dating anniversaries, Valentine's Day... Among them, it is Christmas that surprises foreigners. In Japan, Christmas has a strong image of being an event to spend with loved ones rather than an event to spend with a family. Perhaps because of this, around November, "Christmas is only one month away, and if you don't make a lover quickly, it will be a very lonely Christmas." And a person without a lover begins to get impatient. Even in Japan dramas and movie love stories, Christmas is depicted as a romantic scene. It is also an important event to introduce your lover to your family. For Japan, introducing a lover to a family member is when they are thinking about marrying that lover, so carefully choose the clothes and souvenirs to wear that day. On the other hand, in many other countries, it often doesn't make such a heavy sense to let you see your family. Therefore, if you ask Japan lover to "meet your family", there is a possibility that you will misunderstand each other. Some of them may say, "I don't want to get married yet!" and be touched, so be careful. This time, we introduced some of the views of Japan people in love. Talking about love is one of the most exciting topics in class. Let's enroll in Japanese school and talk with people from various countries.
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Sep. 20, 2021
[English/Japanese] Things that Surprised International Students When They Came to Japan - Love (1) Some international students have Japanese lover boyfriends or girlfriends. There are also students who have found someone of the opposite sex they like and ask how to appeal to them. In this article, I would like to introduce some episodes of love that have actually happened to international students. I followed a beautiful woman... A male student was approached by a woman at a train station. She was very beautiful and they had a nice conversation, so the student promised to meet her next time. Later, the woman contacted the student and invited him to her house. The student was very excited to enter the house. And found several of her friends there. The woman told him that they were in the same business. The male student was invited to join the business, but he properly refused. Basically, Japanese women do not actively approach strangers. Also, don't immediately go to a stranger's house, even if the person is a woman. When I gave lady first to a Japanese woman There is a story about a Western student who gave a female employee ”ladies first” treatment, and the female staff mistakenly thought that the student liked her. In the old days in Japan, women were taught to walk three steps behind men. That is why Japanese women were rarely treated kindly by men. Today, this has changed considerably. However, we do not have ”ladies first” culture like in the West. Therefore, if you do something to a Japanese woman, such as holding the door open for her, she may think, "Maybe that foreigner likes me. " and this may lead to trouble. Treating women well is a good thing, so you may want to proactively introduce yourself to them about your own culture to clear up any misunderstandings. Sudden improvement in Japanese language skills! Sometimes there are students who suddenly become fluent in Japanese. When I talk to such students, they often tell me that they have found a Japanese lover or someone they are slightly attracted to. It is said that the best way to improve your language skills is to get a girlfriend or boyfriend from the country where you are studying. Of course, there are people whose only love interest is someone from their own country. It is very important to "like" something related to Japan. I hope you can find as many "likes" as possible. In this article, I introduced an episode that actually happened. Next time, I would like to introduce the Japanese view of love. What surprised international students when they came to Japan ~ Love (1) ~ There are international students who can have Japan lovers. There are also students who have a favorite opposite sex and ask for advice on how to appeal to them. This time, I would like to introduce an episode about an actual relationship with an international student of the opposite sex. If you follow a beautiful woman... A male international student was approached by a woman at the train station. She was a very beautiful woman, we talked a lot, and I made an appointment to see her next. After that, I was contacted by a woman, and the student who was invited to the woman's house was excited, and when I entered the house, I found several female friends. I heard that they were colleagues in the same business. A male student was offered a job in business, but he refused. Basically, Japan women don't actively talk to strangers. Also, don't go to the house of someone you don't know much about, even if they're women. If you give Japan women lady first There is a story about a Western student who was mistaken for liking a fellow worker (female) at her part-time job when she responded to her as a lady first. In the old Japan, there was a teaching that a woman should walk three steps behind a man. That's why Japan women were less treated kindly by men. A lot has changed now. However, there is no lady-first culture like in the West. Therefore, if a woman Japan acts like waiting for a woman to open the door, she may mistakenly think that "that foreigner may like me," and that may cause trouble. It's good to treat women with care, so you may want to actively introduce your country's culture and clear up any misunderstandings. Sudden increase in Japanese power! Sometimes there are students who suddenly become good at Japanese. When I talk to such students, they often say that they have Japan girlfriends or people who are a little worried. It is said that the shortcut to improving language is to make a lover of the country. Of course, there may be people who only have a love interest from their own country. It is very important to "like" something related to Japan. I hope you can find as many "likes" as possible. This time, we introduced an episode that actually happened. Next time, I would like to introduce Japan people's views on love.
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Sep. 14, 2021
[English/Japanese] Continuing from last week, I would like to introduce the rules of Japanese companies. (1) Is everyone wearing the same clothes? Job hunting When international students are looking for a job, the first thing they do is to buy a recruiting suit. This is because the suits that foreign students bring from their home countries are all shiny and cannot be used for job hunting. When looking for a job in Japan, a black suit with a white shirt is the standard. In addition to this, students who dye their hair should make it the same color as their natural hair, and students with beards should shave their beards. Accessories should be removed and shoes should be low heeled. Women should wear light makeup and wear their hair in a bun. If you do all of these things, all job hunters will look like the same person. Job hunters use the same appearance to show off their individuality. Some students from foreign countries think that their appearance is also their personality and refuse to shave their beards. Depending on the type of business, you may not have to wear a recruiting suit, but most companies will first look at your appearance to see if you can follow Japanese rules. You should polish your Japanese language skills so that you can appeal your personality in your speech. (2) Japanese companies are still old-fashioned. For a long time, Japanese people have had a negative image of working too much, working too much overtime, increasing salary with age, male dominated society, and difficulty in taking vacations. In modern times, this is gradually improving, but there are still many companies that have this tendency. For example, let's say you have plans to go on a trip on your day off. You tell the people at work about it. Do you know what you should do the next time you go to the office? Usually, Japanese people buy as many souvenirs as the number of employees in the company (the number of employees in the department). Also, when you give out souvenirs, you give them out to the people with the highest positions first. Furthermore, if the trip was not on a holiday, but on a paid holiday, you would say to the other employees, "I apologize for the inconvenience." It is very difficult to understand the unique culture within a company from the beginning. First of all, you should look at the Japanese people around you and observe what they are doing. Also, many Japanese companies have a system where senior employees teach newcomers their jobs when they join the company. As a newcomer, you may want to ask your senior employees a lot of questions. (3) On and off I once heard this story from an international student. "I was invited to a drinking party at my part-time job. I don't drink alcohol, so I refused, but they kept inviting me, so I went. I was able to have a good time at the party. Some of us became good friends. The next day at my part-time job, I was talked to in a fun way as I had been at the drinking party, but I was given a cold attitude. Did I do something wrong?" Why do you think this happened to her? Japanese people don't chat much during work, but after work, they sometimes communicate over drinks. This is called "Nominication". It is a word coined from the Japanese words "nomu (drink)" and "communication. At drinking parties, people drink happily regardless of age or position. However, this is only for drinking parties. Also, when we meet at work, we switch to work mode. It is considered bad to go to the office in the same atmosphere of a drinking party. Try to think of it as a clear distinction between on and off, not a sudden coldness. This is only a small part of what I have covered in this blog. The unique culture of the company is something that even Japanese people have to get used to. Let's learn them little by little. Don't forget to keep a "memo" in your pocket when you learn. This is also a part of Japanese culture. Continuing from last week, I will introduce the rules of Japan company. (1) Are we all wearing the same clothes? Job hunting When international students are looking for a job, they start by buying a recruit suit. This is because all the suits brought by international students from their countries are shiny and cannot be used for job hunting. When you get a job in Japan, you basically wear a white shirt and a black suit. In addition to this, students who dye their hair should have the same color as their natural hair, and students with beards will shave their beards. Remove accessories and wear shoes with low heels. Women also lighten their makeup and tie their hair together. If you put all of this in place, job hunting students will all look the same person. Job hunting students show off their individuality with similar appearances. Some international students refuse to shave because they think that their appearance is their personality. Depending on the industry, you may not be required to wear a recruiting suit, but most companies will first determine whether you can follow the rules of Japan based on your appearance. Hone your Japanese skills so that you can show off your personality in your speeches. (2) A company with a Japan that is still old Traditionally Japan people have had negative images such as "working too much," "working a lot of overtime," "salary increases with age," "male society," and "difficulty taking vacations." In modern times, improvements are being made little by little, but there are still many companies that have this trend. For example, let's say you plan to go on a holiday trip. I told the people at the company about it. Do you know what to do the next time you go to work? Usually, Japan people buy as many souvenirs as there are employees in the company (the number of employees in the department). Also, when handing out souvenirs, they are distributed in order of position. In addition, if you went on a trip not on a holiday and used paid leave, we will hand out souvenirs with the words "We apologize for the inconvenience." It is very difficult to understand the unique culture of a company from the beginning. First of all, look at the Japan people around you and observe what they are doing. In addition, Japan companies often have a system in which senior employees teach newcomers about work when they join the company. If you are a newcomer, you may want to ask various questions from senior employees. (3) On and Off I have heard this story from international students. "I was invited to a drinking party at my part-time job, and I refused because I couldn't drink, but I was invited many times, so I went. We had a good time at the drinking party. Some people have become good friends. The next day, when I was happily talked to like I had at a drinking party at my part-time job, I was treated coldly. Did I do something wrong?" Why do you think this happened? Japan people don't chat much at work, but they sometimes communicate over drinks after work. This is called "nomination." It is a coined word that combines the words "drink" and "communication" in Japanese. At drinking parties, people enjoy drinking regardless of age or position. However, this is only for drinking parties. Also, when you meet at work, it switches to work mode. It is considered bad to go to the office in the atmosphere of a drinking party. It's not that you've suddenly become cold, but rather that there is a clear separation between on and off. This is just a small part of what I have put on my blog. The unique culture of a company is full of things that you can't understand unless you are a Japan person. Let's remember it little by little. Don't forget to keep a note in your pocket when memorizing. This is also a culture of Japan.
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Sep. 7, 2021
[English/Japanese] Things that Surprised International Students When They Came to Japan - Part-time Jobs About 80% of international students have part-time jobs in Japan. In this article, we will introduce some of the culture shocks that international students face when they start working part-time. How much part-time work is possible for international students? To begin with, the "College Student" status of residence does not allow for part-time work. Therefore, most international students apply for a "Permission to Engage in Activity other than that Permitted under the Status of Residence Previously Granted" at the airport on the day they arrive in Japan. Even if you are granted permission, there are various rules regarding part-time work for international students. International students are only allowed to work 28 hours a week. However, during long vacations such as summer vacation, you can work 40 hours a week with a certificate from your school. There are also some jobs that you are not allowed to work, such as nightclubs and pachinko. If you violate these rules, you will not be able to live as a foreign student, so if you work overtime, please make sure that you have not exceeded the number of hours. Also, some students take part-time jobs with high hourly wages late at night and fall asleep in class. Study is the most important thing for international students. Don't get an unreasonable part-time job! Most international students work in restaurants, factories, or convenience stores. Recently, sorting packages for online shopping at a warehouse is a popular job. If you want to find a job in Japan, experience in the hospitality industry can be a career. When choosing a part-time job, be sure to think about and consider many things. What kind of people are in demand? Japanese companies are looking for people who are cooperative and polite. Compared to other countries, Japan has a national character that values teamwork, and it is the same for part-time jobs. Listen to your boss's instructions and work together with your colleagues to get the job done. There are cases where international students are scolded for working alone without consulting anyone. Do you know that there is a word used at work called "ho-ren-sou (spinach)"? "Ho" means "report," "ren" means "contact," and "so" means "consultation. Let's always keep these three words in mind when we work. Also, In Japan, there is a saying, "The customer is God," which means that you should treat your customers as if they are God and be polite and courteous to them. If you can master customer service, you will have a big advantage when you find a job in Japan. You don't need to be good at Japanese to convey your feelings. Unique greetings at part-time jobs I was once asked by an international student, "Do Japanese people say 'Ohayo gozaimasu' even at night? I was once asked by an international student. In restaurants, "Ohayo gozaimasu" is often used as a greeting to start work. The greeting is the same even if the workday starts at 6:00 p.m., for example. This unique culture makes even Japanese people feel uncomfortable when they first start working part-time. There is no clear reason as to why people greet each other in such a way. Be careful, this is a greeting only between store workers and not used for customer Be strict with time! The most common problems that foreign students have at their part-time jobs are related to tardiness and absenteeism. If you are going to be late, be sure to call before the designated time. The same goes for taking time off from your part-time job. Also, if you are at work and it is prayer time, you are not allowed to give priority to prayer. If you have to pray, please try not to work during that time. Also, if you are going to quit your part-time job, please consult with your manager one month in advance. It is not a good idea to quit suddenly. If you quit your part-time job abruptly, people from the same country or the same school as you may not be able to work there anymore. Please be careful. There are students who suddenly become fluent in Japanese when they start working part-time. I have also received reports that they have made Japanese friends and are enjoying their study abroad experience. Of course, the most important thing for international students is to study, but part-time jobs allow you to learn things that you cannot learn at school. Please manage your part-time job carefully and enjoy your life as an international student. At our school, we can help you find a part-time job. What surprised international students when they came to Japan ~Part-time job~ About 80% of privately financed international students work part-time in Japan. In this article, we will introduce the culture shock that international students face when they start working part-time. How long can international students work part-time? In the first place, the status of residence of "College Student" does not allow part-time work. Therefore, most international students apply for "permission to engage in activities outside the status of qualification" at the airport on the day they enter the country. Even if you get permission, there are various rules for part-time work for international students. International students should only work 28 hours a week. However, in the case of long vacations, such as summer vacation, you can get a certificate from the school and work 40 hours a week. There are also jobs that you should not work in, such as nightclubs and pachinko. If you violate these requirements, you will not be able to live your study abroad life, so if you work overtime, make sure that you do not exceed the number of hours. In addition, there are people who work part-time jobs late at night with high hourly wages and end up dozing off during class. Studying is the most important thing for international students. Don't work part-time! Most international students work in restaurants, factories, convenience stores, etc. Recently, the job of sorting packages for online shopping at a warehouse is popular. If you want to get a job in Japan, experience in the hospitality industry can be a career. When you work part-time, be careful about various things when you make a choice. What kind of human resources are in demand? Companies in Japan need collaborative and courteous people. Japan has a national character that values teamwork compared to other countries, and the same is true for part-time jobs. Listen to your boss's instructions and work together with your colleagues. Some international students work alone without consulting anyone and are scolded. Did you know that one of the words used at work is "spinach"? "Ho" is "report", "goodwill" is "contact", and "so" is "consultation". Always keep these three words in mind when working. Also, in Japan, there is a saying, "The customer is God." It means that you must think of your customers as gods and serve them politely and politely. If you master customer service, you will have a great advantage when you get a job in Japan. Even if you're not good at Japanese, you can still get the feeling. Serve customers with sincerity. Unique greetings of part-time workers An international student once asked me, "Do Japan people say 'good morning' even at night?" In restaurants, etc., "good morning" is often used as a greeting at the start of work. For example, if work starts at 6 p.m., the greeting is the same. This culture feels strange when even Japan people start working part-time. There is no clear reason why we say such a greeting. Please note that this is a conversation between clerks and is not used for customers. Be strict with time! The troubles that international students often cause at part-time jobs are often related to "tardiness" and "absenteeism". If you're going to be late, be sure to contact us before the scheduled time. This is the same when you take a break from your part-time job. Also, if it is time to pray while you are at work, you are not allowed to prioritize prayer. If you have prayers, please do not include part-time work at that time. Also, if you want to quit your part-time job, consult with the store manager one month in advance. It's not good to quit suddenly. People from the same country or school as you may not be able to work part-time there. Be careful. There are students who suddenly become better at Japanese when they start working part-time. I have also received reports that I have made friends with Japan and that my study abroad life has become more enjoyable. Of course, the most important thing for international students is studying, but part-time work allows you to learn what you can't learn at school. Let's manage it carefully by yourself and enjoy your study abroad life. * At our school, you can consult when looking for a part-time job.
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Sep. 1, 2021
[English/Japanese] Continuing from the previous article, I would like to introduce the public transportation system in Japan. Are trains and buses quiet in Japan? I often hear from international students that they are surprised at how quiet buses are in Japan. In Japan, it is against etiquette to talk loudly or make phone calls on the train or bus. Therefore, when you see people on the train, most of them are operating their phones or reading books. Also, you may see women dozing off because it is not only quiet but also safe. However, there is one sight that surprises foreigners, even among Japanese people who are said to have good manners. That is, there are women who wear makeup on the train. I've heard many people say that they stared at the dexterity of these women as they applied their makeup on the train. It would be interesting to look around and see what they are doing when you get on the train or bus. The hellish commuter rush Compared to people in other countries, the Japanese are a nation of people who keep their distance from each other. However, on the train during commuting, you will see scenes that make this hard to believe. In Tokyo, from about 7:30 to 9:00 in the morning, the train occupancy rate is about 180%. The boarding rate is the ratio of the number of people actually on board to the capacity. When the ratio is 100%, all the seats are occupied; when it is 180%, the train is so crowded that people standing in the train have a hard time just keeping both feet on the ground. In this crowded train, fights often break out. Everyone is irritated and it is a dangerous train. I have heard that some foreign tourists ride the train on purpose to experience this commuter rush. This is not something that I would ever recommend doing, so please do not do this. Do you ride the bus from the front? Do you ride from the back? Did you know that the way to get on a train is the same for all trains, but the way to get on a bus is different depending on the bus? Basically, buses have a front door and a back door. Some ride from the front, while others ride from the back. Also, some buses have a flat rate and you pay at the beginning, while others have different rates based on the number of bus stops you pass. The system differs from bus to bus, so when you get on a bus, ask the bus driver how to get on, or watch other people before you get on the bus. By the way, when you want to get off, listen to the announcement saying the name of the bus stop and press the button. This is the same for all buses, so don't worry. Forgotten items will be returned. What should you do if you have forgotten your luggage on the train? If you notice that you forget something right away, tell the station staff right away the train you were on and where you were sitting. If you are lucky, you may be able to get it from a station staff member at another station. If you notice it after a while, go to the Lost and Found Center. Lost-and-found centers are located at major stations, as well as the last and first stations. Tell the station staff what you lost and when you lost it there. Lost and found items taken to the Lost and Found Center may be given to the police station after a certain period of time. If you have forgotten something on the train, you can almost always find it if you take care of it as soon as possible. I hope you were able to learn about trains and buses in Japan. Our school has a dormitory on the upper floor of the building. Since you don't have to take the commuter train and you don't have to pay for the train, you can concentrate on your studies from morning. Please come and visit the dormitory. This time, as in the previous article, we will introduce public transportation in Japan. Are Japan trains and buses quiet? I often hear from international students that the Japan bus was very quiet and surprising. In Japan, it is bad manners to talk loudly or make phone calls on trains and buses. Therefore, when you see people on the train, most of them are operating their smartphones or reading books. In addition, not only is it quiet, but it is also safe, so I sometimes see women dozing off. However, even Japan people who are said to have good manners have a scene that surprises foreigners. That is, there are women wearing makeup on the train. I often hear stories of women who put on makeup well even in a shaking car, and their dexterity was stared at. It might be interesting to look around when you get on a train or bus and observe what you're doing. Hellish commute rush Japan people are a country that keeps a distance from people compared to people from other countries. But on the train when commuting to work, you can see this incredible sight. In Tokyo, trains from about 7:30 to 9:00 in the morning have a ridership rate of about 180%. Occupancy rate is the ratio of the number of people actually riding to capacity. If the occupancy rate is 100%, it means that all seats are occupied. In 180% of cases, people standing on the train are very crowded, even with their feet on the ground. On this crowded train, fights often occur. Everyone is irritated and it is a dangerous train. I have heard that some foreign tourists ride on purpose to experience this commuting rush. This is not something that can be recommended, so please do it. Do you take the bus from the front? Riding from behind? The way to ride the train is the same for all trains, but did you know that the way to ride the bus differs depending on the bus? Buses basically have a front door and a back door. Some types ride from the front, while others ride from the back. There is also a flat fare, with some buses paying for it first, while others have different fares depending on the number of bus stops you pass by. Different buses have different systems, so when you get on the bus, ask the bus driver how to get on the bus, or watch other people and get on the bus. By the way, when you want to get off, listen to the announcement saying the name of the bus stop and press the button. Rest assured that this is the same for all buses. Lost items come back What should I do if I forget my luggage on the train? If you notice something you forgot right away, tell the station staff immediately what train you were on and where you were sitting. If you're lucky, you can get it from a station staff at another station. If you notice it after a while, go to the lost and found center on the train. Lost and found centers are located at large stations, terminus stations, and first stations. So, tell the station staff when and what you dropped. Lost items brought to the Lost Property Center may be handed over to the police station after a certain period of time. If you forget something on the train, you can find it in most cases if you deal with it early. Were you able to learn about Japan trains and buses? Our school has a dormitory on the upper floor of the school building. You don't have to take the commuter train and you don't have to pay for the train, so you can concentrate on your studies from the morning. Please come and visit the dormitory.
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Aug. 24, 2021
[English/Japanese] There are many foreign tourists who come to Japan and take the train from the airport. However, Japanese trains have unique rules and systems that can be very complicated for those who are not used to them. In this article, I would like to introduce you to the Japanese train system. Complicated and difficult to understand! Subway route map Have you ever seen a train route map in Tokyo? (See the picture.) It looks like a maze and has a very complicated shape. I've heard that foreign tourists panic when they see this map. Especially the subway is more complicated. However, if you learn the colors of the subway symbols, it may seem a little easier. The Tokyo subway system is color-coded. If you get lost in a station, you can easily reach your destination by walking towards the colored markings. Please be aware of this and take a look. Being late is strictly prohibited One of the most common surprises I hear from international students when they get on the train is that the train arrives on time. If you are even one minute late, you may see a "delay" notice on the electronic bulletin board. Also, when you board a delayed train, you will hear the conductor announce, "We apologize for the delay in the train. " When student heard this announcement, she once asked me why I was apologizing when the train was only delayed for one minute. If there is a delay, you will be notified immediately on the Internet. It might be a good idea to check before you get on the train. Don't make the mistake of riding in the women-only car During the morning commute, the rear car of the train is sometimes reserved for women. The term "women-only car" does not mean that only women can ride in it. Boys of elementary school age or younger, disabled people and their caregivers are also allowed to ride. I have heard of a man who made a last-minute rush to get on a train just as it was about to depart, and was embarrassed when he mistakenly got on the women-only car. When you get on a train, make sure you have enough time to spare. Different melodies at each station When you get on or off the train, you will hear music. Did you know that the music is different for each station? For example, Ueno Station, which is famous for its cherry blossoms, plays the melody of the song "Sakura," while Takadanobaba Station plays the theme song from the anime "Astro Boy" by the famous cartoonist Osamu Tezuka. Incidentally, Hachioji Station, where our school is located, plays a children's song called "Yuuyake Koyake". Please listen to it when you get on the train. There are many other things that international students are surprised to hear on the train. I will continue to introduce them in the next article. Many people come to Japan and take the train from the airport. However, Japan trains have unique rules and systems, which can be very complicated for those who are not used to them. This time, I will introduce such a Japan train. Complex and difficult! Subway Map Have you ever seen a train map in Tokyo? It looks like a maze and has a very complex shape. I have heard that foreign tourists who see this route map are the first to panic. Especially the subway is more complicated. However, it may seem a little easier if you remember the color of the subway mark. Each subway in Tokyo is color-coded. If you get lost in the station, you can walk towards the landmarks of that color to make it easier to reach your destination. Please be aware of it. Late arrivals are strictly prohibited The most common story that international students hear about being surprised on the train is that the train comes on time. If you are even 1 minute late, you may see a "delay" notification on the electronic bulletin board. Also, when you get on a delayed train, the conductor announces, "I'm sorry that the train is late." When I heard this announcement, a student asked me, "Why apologize when you're only one minute late?" Information about delays is constantly circulating on the Internet. You may want to check it out before you get on the train. Don't make a mistake and ride Women-only car During the morning commute, the rear car of the train may be a women-only car. Even though it is a "women-only car", it does not mean that only women can ride it, but it is also available to boys of elementary school age and younger, people with physical disabilities, and their caregivers. I have heard stories of men who rushed in at the last minute when the train was leaving and accidentally got into the women-only car, which made him feel embarrassed. When you get on the train, be sure to allow plenty of time. Different melodies for each station Music plays when you get off the train and get on it. Did you know that the music is different for each station? For example, Ueno Station, famous for its cherry blossoms, plays the melody of a song called "Sakura", and Takadanobaba Station plays the theme song of the anime "Astro Boy" by famous manga artist Osamu Tezuka. By the way, in Hachioji, where our school is located, a nursery rhyme called "Yuyake Koyake" is played. Please ask when you get on the train. There are many other things that surprise international students on the train. We will continue to introduce it next time.
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Aug. 2, 2021
[English/Japanese] August has arrived and the weather has been hot, with temperatures hitting 30 degrees Celsius every day. In this article, I would like to introduce the climate and natural phenomena of Japan. Are you surprised only at first? Earthquakes Japan is famous for its earthquakes, and the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011, with a magnitude of 9.0 on the Richter scale, caused tremendous damage. Although the Great East Japan Earthquake was a large scale earthquake, smaller earthquakes occur about 15 times a year in Tokyo. Therefore, some international students panic when they feel an earthquake for the first time after coming to Japan, but after experiencing it a few times, they get used to it and don't worry about it. Is this a good thing? You never know when a big earthquake will hit. "Don't think that this earthquake will be small, but be prepared to escape at any time. Students with abdominal pain in June Beware of the rainy season! Summer in Japan is not only hot, but also very humid and difficult to live with. June in particular is the rainy season. During the rainy season, the humidity is even higher, which makes it easier for food to spoil. I have heard many stories of foreign students getting food poisoning from eating food that has been stored in their rooms as it was when they were in their own countries. Please keep food in the refrigerator as much as possible and observe the expiration dates. Many people are addicted to kotatsu, a winter specialty. Winters in Japan are cold. In snowy countries, houses are built for winter and you can stay warm, but this is not the case in Tokyo. That's where the "Kotatsu" comes in. Have you ever heard of a kotatsu? It is a table with a heater. There are many international students who are addicted to the kotatsu. The kotatsu is warm and covered with a futon, so it is not uncommon to hear stories of people falling asleep while doing their homework. If you come to Japan, please try it at least once. You will never be able to get out of the kotatsu. Onset from the second year! Hay fever Many people suddenly develop hay fever in their second year of studying in Japan. In Japan, cedar pollen starts to fly all over the country around mid-January. Many people suffer from hay fever due to the pollen, and once you have it, you can't get rid of it unless you get special treatment. It is said that one in four Japanese suffer from hay fever. The main symptoms of hay fever are sneezing, runny nose, and itchy eyes. If you have hay fever in Japan, you should go to a hospital and get some medicine. Did you all understand about the climate and natural phenomena in Japan? Our school holds a disaster drill once a year. In this drill, we receive instructions from the local fire department so that we can evacuate calmly in case of a big earthquake. Our school supports students to live in the dormitory with peace of mind. We are looking forward to your enrollment. In August, the temperature has been over 30 degrees Celsius every day. This time, we will introduce the climate and natural phenomena of Japan. Only the first surprise? earthquake Japan is famous for its earthquake-prone country. The Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011 was a magnitude 9.0 earthquake that caused enormous damage. The Great East Japan Earthquake is a large-scale earthquake, but in the case of small earthquakes, it occurs about 15 times a year in Tokyo. Therefore, some international students panic when they feel an earthquake for the first time when they come to Japan, but after experiencing it a few times, they get used to it and don't care about anything when an earthquake occurs. Is this a good thing? You never know when a big earthquake will come. Don't think, "Is it another small earthquake?" and be prepared to escape at any time. Students with abdominal pain in June Beware of the rainy season! Summer in Japan is not only hot, but also humid, making it difficult to spend. Especially June is the rainy season. In the rainy season, the humidity is even higher, so the food spoils easily. I often hear stories of international students who store food in their rooms as they were when they were in their own country, and eat them get food poisoning. Please keep the expiration date and expiration date properly, and store it in the refrigerator as much as possible. Many people fit in Winter specialty "Kotatsu" Winters in Japan are cold. In snowy countries, the house is for winter and you can spend a warm time, but not in Tokyo. That's where "kotatsu" comes in. Have you ever heard of "kotatsu"? It is a table with a heater. There are many international students who are addicted to this kotatsu. I often hear that they fell asleep while doing their homework on the kotatsu because they were warmed and had a futon draped over them. If you come to Japan, please try it at least once. You won't be able to get out of the kotatsu. Onset from the second year! hay fever In the second year of study abroad, many people suddenly develop hay fever. In Japan, around mid-January, cedar pollen begins to fly throughout the country. Many people suffer from hay fever because of that pollen. Once it develops, it cannot be cured unless you receive special treatment. It is said that 1 in 4 people with hay fever develops in Japan. The main symptoms of hay fever (1 in 2 people in Tokyo) are sneezing, runny nose, and itchy eyes. If you come to Japan and develop the disease, go to the hospital and get medicine. Do you understand the climate and natural phenomena of Japan? Our school conducts disaster prevention drills once a year. In this disaster prevention drill, you will receive guidance from the local fire department so that you can calmly evacuate even if a large earthquake occurs. At our school, we support you so that you can live in a dormitory with peace of mind. We look forward to your enrollment.
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  • Japan
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  • Rain
  • Winter
  • Spring
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Jul. 27, 2021
[English] The Olympics have finally arrived in Japan. Although the atmosphere is quieter than usual because of the Corona disaster, the people of Japan are excited by the heated competition every day. In this article, I would like to introduce the unique "event" culture of Japan. Normally quiet people turn into different people! Traditional Festivals In Japan, festivals are held all over the country in the summer. Festivals are popular events among foreign tourists, but it is often said that foreigners who see the festivities see something completely different from the usual Japanese. At Japanese festivals, people walk around the city lifting a small house of God called a "mikoshi" with many other people. The people walking with the mikoshi keep shouting loudly and sometimes collide with other mikoshi, to the point where it looks violent. Men, who normally wear suits, participate in the festival in only their underwear, almost naked. Also, perhaps because Japanese people feel more relaxed on festival days than usual, their manners become more lax and many people get into fights. A similar phenomenon is "Halloween". In the last decade, the number of people enjoying Halloween events has increased in Japan, but the bad manners have been in the news every year. It is said that Japanese people are usually very stressed. Festivals may be an outlet for that stress. Let's be careful when we participate! Valentine's Day: The Chocolate Wars In your country, who do you give Valentine's Day gifts to and what do you give them? If you ask our students the same question, they will answer, "I send a bouquet of flowers to a woman on Valentine's Day. This is not the case in Japan. In Japan, it is different. In Japan, Valentine's Day is a day for women to give chocolates to men. Therefore, from the end of January, department stores start to sell high-end chocolates. Men get nervous and restless on the morning of February 14th. Do you think men who get lots of chocolates are happy? Actually, I can't say I'm happy. What's more, there is a day on March 14 called "White Day" when you have to return the gifts you received on Valentine's Day. It is implicitly understood that on White Day, you should prepare a gift that is three times the price of the chocolate you received on Valentine's Day. Do you still want to receive chocolates? Who do you spend Christmas with? In your country, Christmas is an event to spend with whom? In Japan, it is popular as an event to spend with your lover. Also, Japanese people eat fried chicken instead of turkey on Christmas. And most of the people who celebrate Christmas are Buddhists. Christmas in Japan must be full of discomfort for foreigners. Then, on December 26, all the Christmas atmosphere in the city disappears, and all at once it becomes New Year's mode. “Obon" to welcome the dead In the middle of August, there is a day called "Obon" to welcome the dead. During Obon, families wash the graves and welcome the spirits of their ancestors into their homes. There is a mysterious doll that is made at that time. One is a "horse doll" with chopsticks attached to a cucumber, and the other is a "cow doll" with chopsticks attached to an eggplant. It is said that the spirits of the dead ride these "horses" back to their homes and "cows" back to the land of the dead. In some areas, lamps called lanterns are floated down the river to mourn the dead. The scenery is sad but beautiful. In your country, what do you do during Obon? Have you learned anything new about events in Japan? In our school, we have seasonal events and activities. Learning about Japanese events is also a way to learn about the Japanese spirit. Please try to participate in them. The Olympic Games have finally been held in Japan. Since the event is held in Coronavirus pandemic, the atmosphere is quieter than usual, but the people are excited about the heated matches every day. This time, we will introduce Japan's unique "event" culture. People who are usually quiet have changed! Traditional festivities In Japan, festivals are held in various places in the summer. The festival is also a popular event for foreign tourists, but it is often said that foreigners who see the festival see a completely different appearance from ordinary Japanese people. In Japanese festivals, people sometimes walk around the city while lifting a small god's house called a "mikoshi" with a large number of people. People walking with mikoshi keep shouting loudly, and sometimes they collide with other mikoshi, so much so that they look violent. Men who usually wear suits also participate almost naked, now only in their underwear. Also, on festival days, Japanese people are more liberated than usual, so their manners are sloppy and there are many people who fight. A similar phenomenon is Halloween. In the last 10 years, the number of people who enjoy Halloween events in Japan has increased, and their bad manners are in the news every year. Japanese people are usually stressed. Festivals may be an outlet for that stress. Be careful when participating! Valentine's Day Chocolate Sales In your country, who do you give Valentine's Day to? If you ask our students, the answer is, "Valentine's Day sends bouquets of flowers to women." Japan is different. Valentine's Day in Japan is a day when women give chocolates to men. Therefore, from the end of January, the high-end chocolate sales season begins in department stores. Males become fidgety and restless on the morning of February 14. Do you think a man who gets a lot of chocolate is happy? Not really. On March 14th, there is a day called "White Day" when you have to return the gift you received on Valentine's Day. On that White Day, it is an unspoken agreement to prepare a gift that is three times the price of the chocolate you received on Valentine's Day. Do you still want to get chocolate? Who do you spend Christmas with? Who is Christmas with in your country? In Japan, it is popular as an "event to spend time with lovers". Also, the Japanese eat fried chicken instead of Christmas turkey. And most of the people celebrating Christmas are Buddhists. Christmas in Japan must be full of discomfort for foreigners. And on December 26, all the Christmas atmosphere in the city disappears and you go into New Year's mode at once. "Obon" to greet the dead In the middle of August, there is a day called "Obon" that welcomes the dead. Obon washes graves with families and welcomes the spirits of ancestors into their homes. There is a mysterious doll that is made at that time. There is a "horse doll" with chopsticks on a cucumber and a "cow doll" with chopsticks on an eggplant. It is said that the spirits of the dead ride home on this "horse" and return to the land of the dead on a "cow". In addition, there are areas where lamps called lanterns are poured into the river to mourn the dead. The scenery is sad but beautiful. What do you do for Obon in your country? Have you learned anything new about events in Japan? Our school conducts seasonal events. To know Japanese events is to know the heart of the Japanese people. Please join us.
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  • Life in Japan
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Jul. 19, 2021
[English/Japanese] Things that Surprised Foreign Students When They Came to Japan: Shops (2) This time, I would like to introduce you to some of the "stores" in the city. Bookstores are full of manga, contents that even adults can enjoy What kind of books are available in bookstores in your country? When a foreigner enters a Japanese bookstore, he or she is surprised to see how many manga are available. Manga is one of Japan's most famous subcultures in the world, and I often hear that people are surprised to find that even adults read manga. The famous Doraemon and Dragon Ball are works for children, but there are also many works for adults. For example, there are stories about businessmen succeeding in their jobs or lawyers playing an active role in court. There are also children who study by reading historical and scientific cartoons. Students at the University of Tokyo, which is famous for its high academic achievement, are also encouraged to study manga. It may be a little difficult for those who have just started studying Japanese, but please pick up a manga. You may find your world expanding. Shocking ticket prices! Movie theaters I often hear stories of international students who wanted to go see a movie, went to the movie theater, and then gave up on seeing it. Why is that? It's because the ticket price is too high. In most student countries, it costs less than 1000 yen to see a movie. In Japan, however, an adult ticket costs as much as 1,800 yen to see a movie. That's why people give up watching movies. It varies a little from theater to theater, but if you choose a day when women are cheap or a service day, you can see a movie for about 1,000 yen. Check out the cheap days before you go. Seven Wonders of the Restaurant The salt piled up like Mt. Fuji at the entrance of a restaurant... the flying forks and fake food in the showcase... the small towels served when you sit down... the food that comes to you even though you didn't ask for it... To a foreigner, there are many strange things about Japanese restaurants. ・The salt piled up like Mt. Fuji at the entrance is to pray for business prosperity. ・The flying forks and fake food in the showcase are called "food samples". These are models of food made of wax or synthetic resin. They are very popular among foreign tourists, and many people buy small key chains and other items as souvenirs. ・A small towel is called an "oshibori". A small towel called "oshibori" is used to wipe your hands before eating. ・A dish that you didn't order but which is already ordered... This dish is called "otoshi" and is brought to your table when you enter a restaurant that serves alcohol, such as an izakaya (Japanese style pub), even if you didn't order it. The price is about 300 to 500 yen. Have you learned a little about Japanese restaurants? Our school's library has not only a wide variety of books for reading, but also a wide variety of manga, which can be checked out. Let's use manga to understand Japanese culture and go out on the town! What surprised international students when they came to Japan ~Shop edition (2)~ This time, we will introduce the "shops" in the city. Bookstores are full of comics, content that adults can also enjoy What kind of books are available in bookstores in your country? When foreigners enter Japan bookstores, they are surprised by the number of manga. Manga is famous around the world as a subculture of Japan, but I often hear that even adults are surprised to read manga. The famous Doraemon and Dragon Ball are for children, but there are also many works for adults. For example, a story about a salaryman succeeding in his job or a lawyer playing an active role in a court case. There are also children who study by reading historical and science comics. Students at the University of Tokyo, which is famous for their high academic ability, are also studying manga. It may be a little difficult for those who have just studied Japanese, but please try it. Your world may expand. I was surprised by the ticket price! movie theater I often hear stories of international students who wanted to go to the cinema and gave up watching it. Why is that? That's because tickets are expensive. In most student countries, it costs less than 1000 yen to watch a movie. However, when watching movies in Japan, the adult fee is as much as 1800 yen. That's why I give up watching movies. It varies slightly depending on the movie theater, but there are days when women can see it for about 1000 yen if they choose a cheap day or a service day. Let's check out the cheap days before going. Seven wonders of restaurants Salt served like Mt. Fuji at the entrance of the restaurant ... Showcase flying forks and fake dishes... A small towel is served when you sit down... Dishes that are brought to you even though you didn't order them ... There are many strange things in Japan restaurants for foreigners. ・ Salt served like Mt. Fuji at the entrance → prayers for prosperous business. Showcase flying forks and fake dishes → called "food samples". Models of dishes made of wax or synthetic resin. It is very popular with foreign tourists, and many people buy small key chains as souvenirs. ・A small towel → called an "oshibori". It is used when wiping hands before eating. ・ Dishes that are ordered even though you did not order them: It is a dish called "otsushi" and is mainly served in izakaya and other restaurants that serve alcohol, and when you enter the store, it is brought to the table even if you have not ordered it. The price is about 300~500 yen. Do you know a little about Japan store? Our library has not only extensive reading books but also a wide variety of manga, which can be borrowed. Let's understand the culture of Japan with manga and go out into the city!
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  • Japan
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  • Subculture
  • Manga
  • Food model crafts
  • Izakaya
  • Etiquette
  • Cinema
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Jul. 12, 2021
[English/Japanese] Things that Surprised International Students When They Came to Japan: Shops (1) For two consecutive weeks, I have been telling you about the city, but this time I would like to introduce you to the "stores" in the city. All stores in Japan are famous for their courteous service, and the customers themselves are known to form beautiful lines when waiting in line at the cash register. Here I would like to share with you what kind of problems international students encounter when they come to Japan for the first time and shop, based on the stories of our students. Convenience stores are a bit expensive but convenient. Is this juice? Or is it alcohol? There are about 7,800 convenience stores in Tokyo. In other words, the city is full of convenience stores. Most of them open 24 hours a day, so international students often say things like, "It's convenient because they are open even when I come home from my part-time job late at night.” and "I don't feel scared when I walk alone late at night because the stores are well-lit. ” Also, when international students enter a convenience store for the first time, they are surprised at the large number of products. I often hear that they are impressed by the variety of drinks. However, there are many stories of people who bought what they thought was a beautifully packaged juice, only to find out that it was alcohol. Because of this kind of trouble, the Chinese character for "liquor" is not usually taught at the beginner level, but at our school, it is taught immediately after entering the country. Please be careful, everyone. Do you buy too much? 100-yen stores Did you know that there are stores where all items are sold for 100 yen (excluding tax)? Although not as common as convenience stores, there are nearly 800 of these 100-yen stores in Tokyo. These 100-yen stores, commonly known as "100-yen stores," offer daily necessities (dishes, cleaning supplies, etc.) and even food. Therefore, when students start living in Japan and need daily necessities, they go to these 100-yen stores to buy them. Not only are they inexpensive, but they also come in a variety of designs, and once they have been to a 100 yen store, many of them end up going back again and again to buy things they don't need. I often hear stories of students, especially those who have just arrived in Japan, who have spent a lot of money at 100 yen stores. This is the time when you need money until you start your part-time job. Be careful when shopping. A room full of stuffed animals! Be careful not to get too carried away at the game center. Just like 100-yen stores, game arcades are a place where people tend to spend a lot of money. Some study abroad students get addicted to "crane games" and spend a lot of money on them. And before they know it, their room is covered with stuffed animals from the crane game. Because of this, students often throw away their stuffed animals as trash when they move out, crying because they have too much luggage. Students often feel lonely when studying abroad, and many of them find comfort in their stuffed animals. Try not to have too many stuffed animals, and enjoy them! Did you get to know about Japanese stores? We will continue to introduce stores in the next article. By the way, our school has a convenience store and a 100 yen store just a few meters away from the school (student dormitory). Even if you have just arrived in Japan, you can get everything you need quickly. You can learn how to shop with your teacher at first, so you can start your new life with peace of mind. What surprised international students when they came to Japan ~Shop edition (1)~ For two weeks in a row, we have been telling you about the state of the city, but this time we will introduce the "shops" in the city. All Japan shops are polite in their customer service, and customers themselves are famous for forming a beautiful line when they line up at the cash register. Here, we will tell you what kind of trouble international students cause when they come to Japan for the first time and shop, based on the stories of our students. A little expensive but convenient convenience store Is this juice? Alcohol? There are about 7,800 convenience stores in Tokyo. In other words, the city is full of convenience stores. Since most convenience stores are open 24 hours a day, international students have commented, "It's convenient because it's open even when you come home from a part-time job late at night." or "It's not scary because it's bright even if you walk alone at night." I often hear that. Also, when international students enter a convenience store for the first time, they are very surprised by the number of products. Among them, I often hear that they were impressed by the number of drinks. However, there are many stories that when I bought it thinking it was a juice in a beautiful package, it was alcohol. Because of these troubles, the kanji "sake" is not usually learned at the beginner level, but at our school, we try to teach it immediately after entering the country. Please be careful. Do you buy too much? Shops with 100 yen uniform Did you know that there are stores where you can buy all products for 100 yen (+ consumption tax)? Although not as much as convenience stores, there are nearly 800 shops in Tokyo that offer 100 yen uniforms. This 100-yen shop, commonly known as the "100 yen shop", has daily necessities (tableware, cleaning tools, etc.) and food. Therefore, when students start living in Japan and need daily necessities, they go to this 100-yen shop to buy them. Not only is it cheap, but there are also various designs, and once you go to a 100 yen shop, many people go there many times and buy things they don't need. In particular, I often hear stories of students who have just entered the country and splurged money at 100-yen shops. This is when you need money until your part-time job starts. Let's shop carefully. Before you know it, a room full of stuffed animals! Be careful not to get too stuck in the arcade. Just like a 100-yen shop, it's a "game center" where you end up spending money. Among them, there are international students who are so addicted to the "crane game" that they spend a lot of money. In addition, before you know it, the whole room is full of stuffed crane games. Because of this, students often throw away stuffed animals when they move as garbage that makes them cry because they have too much luggage. Studying abroad often feels lonely, and many students are healed by stuffed animals. Let's enjoy the stuffed animals so as not to add too much. Did you get to know about Japan's shop? We plan to continue to introduce the store next time. By the way, our school has a convenience store and a 100 yen shop a few meters from the school (student dormitory). Even if you have just entered the country, you can prepare what you need immediately. You can start your new life with peace of mind because you can shop with your teacher at first.
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  • Japan
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  • Etiquette
  • Convenience store
  • Games
  • 100-yen shop
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Jul. 5, 2021
[English/Japanese] What international students were surprised to learn when they first came to Japan. The City (2) Continuing from the previous article, I would like to introduce the "city" this time as well. Free pocket tissues? In Japan, pocket tissues are distributed in front of train stations every day. It is said that many foreigners are surprised when they see this scene. The reason why they are so surprised is because these pocket tissues are all free. If you look closely at the pocket tissues you receive, you will see advertisements for companies. Thanks to this advertisement, you can get them for free. Sometimes, they give out small snacks or cosmetic samples. Pocket tissues are handy to keep in your bag, so be brave and accept them. Feeling like a king? Many foreign tourists are impressed by the automatic opening of the doors when they get into a cab. Also, Japanese cab drivers are famous for their excellent customer service. However, cabs are more expensive than in other countries, so consult with your wallet before using a cab. Do you ride your bicycle on the sidewalk? On the roadway? Roads in Japan are known to be narrow. Light cars, which are easy to drive on such narrow roads, look like toy cars to foreigners. In addition, bicycles are sometimes ridden on both the roadway and sidewalk, making it difficult for them to understand the rules for bicycles. International students often get stopped by the police and pay fines because they do not understand the bicycle rules. As a general rule, bicycles are to be ridden on the road. (There are some exceptions where bicycles can be ridden on the sidewalk. Be sure to check the traffic rules carefully before you ride. Have you learned about Japanese cities? At our school, we hold a traffic rules seminar every six months. In order to live safely in Japan, let's make sure to learn the traffic rules. What surprised international students when they came to Japan ~ The state of the city (2) ~ This time, we will continue to introduce the state of the city. Free tissues! In Japan, pocket tissues are handed out in front of the station on a daily basis. It seems that many foreigners are surprised to see this scene. The reason why you are surprised is that all of these pocket tissues are free. If you look closely at the pocket tissue you received, you will see an advertisement for the company. Thanks to this ad, you can get it for free. Sometimes, small sweets, cosmetic samples, etc. are also handed out. Pocket tissues can be useful if you keep them in your bag, so be brave enough to take them. Feeling like a king? There are many foreign tourists who are impressed by the automatic opening of the door when taking a taxi. Japan taxi drivers are also famous for their excellent customer service. However, taxi fares are higher than in other countries, so consult with your wallet before using a taxi for transportation. Are bicycles on sidewalks? Roadway? The roads of Japan are notoriously narrow anyway. It is said that the "mini automobile" that is easy to drive even on narrow roads looks like a toy car to foreigners. In addition, bicycles may be running on both the roadway and the sidewalk, and the rules for bicycles can be confusing. International students often don't know the rules of cycling and are stopped by the police and pay fines. By the way, as a rule, bicycles should be ridden on the roadway. (Sidewalks may be allowed as exceptions.) Be sure to check the traffic rules carefully before driving. How was it? Our school holds a lecture on traffic rules once every six months. Learn the rules well to live safely in Japan.
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  • Life in Japan
  • International students
  • Study abroad
  • Etiquette
  • Bicycle
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Jun. 29, 2021
[English/Japanese] Things that Surprised International Students When They Came to Japan: The City (1) I wrote in my previous blog that there is no trash on the streets in Japan, but there are many other things that are unique to Japan. This time, I would like to introduce some of them. A city full of vending machines Japan is famous for its large number of vending machines. Not only in number, but also in variety. For example, there are vending machines at train stations that sell books, bananas, and other items. I have also heard many stories of people being surprised when a vending machine says "Hello" to them as they walk by. These days, some vending machines have digital images to help you choose a drink, and some even allow you to sign up for a subscription. It is a little more expensive than buying at a store, but it is very convenient, so try to use it. How to ride an escalator Of course, you have escalators in your country, but in Japan, there is an unspoken rule about escalators. In Tokyo, ride on the left side of the escalator, and in Osaka, ride on the right side. This is not an official rule or manner, but for some reason it is the way it is. Of course, there are manners. For example, you may see people walking up the escalator, but this is very bad manners and dangerous, so don't do it! WiFi spots are scarce! Compared to a few years ago, the number of free WiFi spots has been increasing, but compared to other developed countries, there are still very few WiFi spots in Japan. Of course you can use it in convenience stores and fast food restaurants, but be aware that it is often not available in small stores. It is recommended that you check out WiFi spots ahead of time when sightseeing. You too can become a collector. Manholes are art. In many parts of Japan, there are manholes that are designed in the image of the local area. Manhole designs have become so popular that some towns have made them into "manhole cards" and handed them out. Recently, manholes with various anime characters, including Pokemon, have appeared, and some places have become famous as tourist spots. When you are sightseeing in Japan, you are likely to look at the stores and scenery, but please take a look down there as well. (The photo is a manhole in Hachioji. Please come and see it.) What do you think? I plan to tell you more about the city in my next article. Look forward to it! What surprised international students when they came to Japan ~ The state of the city (1) ~ I wrote in my last blog that there is no trash in the Japan city, but there are many other things that are unique to Japan in the city. Here are some of them. A city full of vending machines Japan is famous for having a lot of vending machines. It's not just the number that is large, but also the variety. For example, vending machines selling books and bananas are installed at stations. I also often hear that I was surprised when a vending machine said "hello" while walking. Recently, some of them can choose drinks with digital images, and some allow you to sign up for a subscription. It's a little more expensive than buying it at the store, but it's very convenient, so please use it. Escalator Implicit Rules Of course, there are escalators in your country, but there are unspoken rules for escalators in Japan. That is, when riding in Tokyo, you should be on the left side, and in Osaka, you should be on the right side. This is not a formal rule or etiquette, but for some reason it is like this. Of course, there are manners. For example, you may see people walking up in the direction where everyone else is not standing, but this is very bad manners and dangerous, so let's not do it. Few WiFi spots! Compared to a few years ago, the number of free WiFi spots has increased, but compared to other developed countries, there are still few WiFi spots in Japan. Of course, you can use it at convenience stores and fast food restaurants, but be aware that it is often not possible to use it in small stores. When sightseeing, it is recommended to check WiFi spots first. Be a collector too Manholes are art Japan there are manholes designed in the image of the land. Manhole designs are very popular, and in the city they sometimes hand them out as "manhole cards". Recently, manholes with various anime characters such as Pokémon have appeared, and some places have become famous as tourist spots. While sightseeing in Japan, you will often see shops and scenery, but please take a look below. (*The photo is a manhole in Hachioji.) Please come and see it! ) How was it? We will tell you about the state of the city next time. Please look forward to!
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Jun. 22, 2021
[English/Japanese] Things that Surprised International Students When They Came to Japan: Trash Japanese cities are famous around the world for their cleanliness and lack of litter on the streets. Why is that? In Japan, there are many rules regarding garbage. In addition, foreign students often get into trouble with residents because of this. In this article, I will introduce the rules regarding garbage. No trash cans! Japanese who take their trash home One of the most annoying things for foreign tourists when they come to Japan is that there are no trash cans. Where should you throw away the tissue you blew your nose with, or the candy wrapper you put in your mouth when you got hungry? When Japanese people have small trash, they put it in a pocket in their bag and throw it away when they get home. Also, many people with small children carry plastic bags for garbage in their bags. Some shopping malls and convenience stores have trash cans that anyone can throw away. When sightseeing, it might be a good idea to check the places where garbage can be thrown away with you. How many kinds of garbage should I separate? How to separate garbage When you first start living in Japan, one of the first things that confuses you is how to separate garbage. Let's take a look at the garbage separation in Hachioji City, Tokyo. Combustible trash, non-combustible trash, toxic trash, plastic containers and wrapping, magazines, paper packs, newspapers, cardboard, empty bottles, empty cans, plastic bottles, used cloth, oversize trash.... International students who have just arrived in Japan are surprised by the many types of garbage separation. Also, there are rules for each type of garbage. For example, PET bottles should not be thrown away as they are. The cap and label must be disposed of as plastic waste, while the bottle must be washed and crushed to become plastic bottle garbage. Furthermore, garbage should not be thrown away every day, but on the designated day of the week at the designated place. Depending on where you live, you may also have a set time to throw it away. And the rules change depending on the local government. For example, in Hachioji City, you have to buy the designated garbage bags at the supermarket. What do you think? There are so many rules for garbage disposal, aren't there? In fact, garbage separation is so complicated that even Japanese people make mistakes. Many foreign students who don't understand the rules of trash separation and throw away their trash randomly get into fights with other residents and have to move out. To prevent this from happening, first get a garbage calendar from the city hall and dispose of your garbage according to it. If you are not sure, you can ask a Japanese person. I'm sure he or she will be kind enough to help international students who are making an effort to sort out their garbage. Were you able to learn about the rules of garbage? By the way, our school requires us to live in the school dormitory for six months. And during that time, the school will teach you about garbage. If you don't know how to throw away or separate garbage, you can ask the teacher in charge by e-mail. By learning about garbage for six months, you will be able to stay trouble-free even after you graduate from school. If you are able to separate garbage naturally, you will be able to live well as an international student. What surprised international students when they came to Japan ~Garbage edition~ The city of Japan is famous in the world for its cleanliness and for the fact that there is no trash on the streets. Why? There are many rules regarding garbage in Japan. In addition, this causes problems for international students frequently. This time, I will introduce the rules regarding garbage. No trash cans! Japan people taking garbage home One of the problems that foreign tourists have when they come to Japan is that there are no trash cans. Where do you throw away the tissues you blew your nose and the candy wrappers you put in your mouth when you're hungry? If a small piece of garbage comes out, Japan people put it in their pocket in their bag and throw it away when they go home. Also, if you have small children, many people have plastic bags for garbage in their bags. Shopping malls and convenience stores sometimes have trash cans that anyone can throw away. When sightseeing, it may be a good idea to check the places where garbage can be thrown away together. How many types should I divide? How to separate garbage The first thing that confuses you when you start living in Japan is garbage sorting. Let's take a look at the segregation of Hachioji City, Tokyo. Combustible garbage, non-combustible garbage, hazardous garbage, containers and packaging plastics, magazines, paper cartons, newspapers, cardboard, empty bottles, empty cans, PET bottles, old cloth, bulky garbage... International students who have just arrived in Japan are surprised by the variety of sensible types. There are also rules for each fraction. For example, plastic bottles should not be thrown away as they are. Caps and labels become plastic garbage, and bottles are washed and crushed to become plastic bottle garbage. In addition, garbage should not be thrown away every day, it should be thrown in a designated place on a set day of the week. Also, depending on where you live, there may be a fixed time to throw it away. And the rules change depending on the local government. For example, in Hachioji City, designated garbage bags must be bought at supermarkets. How is it? There are too many rules for throwing away garbage, right? In fact, garbage separation is so complicated that even Japan people can make a mistake. There are many cases where international students who do not know the rules for separating garbage and throw it away appropriately get into a fight with other residents and have to move. To prevent this from happening, first get a trash calendar at the city hall and throw away the garbage according to it. And if you don't understand Japan you can ask people. I think they will teach you politely to international students who are trying to separate garbage. Did you find out about the garbage rules? By the way, our school has to live in the school dormitory for half a year. And in the meantime, we will conduct garbage instruction at school. If you don't know how to dispose of or sort garbage, you can ask your teacher by email. By learning about garbage for half a year, you can spend your time without trouble even after graduating from school. If you can sort garbage naturally, your study abroad life will go well.
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開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Jun. 15, 2021
[English/Japanese] Things that Surprised International Students When They First Came to Japan: Public Safety Japan is known as one of the safest countries in the world. Even if you drop your wallet, you can often get it back,Of course, it depends on the location, but it is safe to walk alone at night. In addition, there is a unique culture born from this safety, which often causes problems for international students. In this article, I would like to introduce some of them. Handkerchiefs on the table Japanese people who secure their seats with luggage In Japan, when you go to a food court, you may find a handkerchief on the table, or sometimes a bag. And no one sits at the table. Even when the place is crowded, no one sits at the table. Why is this? Japanese people sometimes put down their belongings when they reserve a seat for themselves. I once heard a student say, "I was surprised to see people leave their bags with valuables in them.” Handkerchiefs, for example, may not be noticed that they are placed there, so if you sit down by mistake, you may get into trouble. Make sure you check before you sit down. Children walking alone to school: Be careful to talk to them A student wrote an essay about how she was surprised to see a small child walking alone with a big bag on his back. Many elementary school children in Japan walk to school alone. Some of them are as young as six years old and ride the train to school by themselves. Some of the international students like children and will ask a child who is walking alone, "Are you okay by yourself?" or "You are so cute!“ However, if you do this, you may be reported to the police, so if you see a child walking alone, just watch him or her gently. Can I have these vegetables?:Unattended Vegetable Sales In the fields of Japan, there are sometimes small huts where no one is around and vegetables are sold. When you want to pay, you put money in a box inside the hut. The international students who saw the hut for the first time were impressed by the fact that the money box was placed outside. Many students use the unmanned market because they can get fresh vegetables at a lower price than at the supermarket. In addition, some students mistakenly take vegetables that are thrown away in the fields or nuts from trees in the park, thinking that they are allowed to take them, and end up being caught by the police. All plants grown outside have their owners, so please do not take them. Twice in one day!:International Students and Police check Japanese police officer often stops and asks questions to people he or she thinks are suspicious on the street. Thanks to these questions, crimes can often be prevented. International students are often questioned , especially male students, sometimes twice a day. During the questioning, you will be asked if you are carrying your residence card, which school you go to, and so on. Even if you are going to the local convenience store, be sure to take your residence card with you when you go out. What did you think? Even in Japan, which is considered to be a safe country, there is of course the danger of being involved in crime. Please do not feel overly secure, and be careful while you are studying abroad. By the way, when you enter our school, we try to get to know you by going to the police station in your neighborhood, participating in local events and volunteering, etc. Building a good relationship with your neighbors is necessary for a smooth life as an international student. When you come to Japan, be sure to greet the people you see every day with a cheerful greeting. What surprised international students when they came to Japan ~Security~ Japan is known as one of the safest countries in the world. Even if you drop your wallet, it often comes back, and of course it depends on the location, but it is safe to walk alone at night. In addition, there is a unique culture born from this safety, which can often cause problems for international students. Here are a few: Handkerchief on the table: Japan people securing a seat with luggage In Japan, when you go to the food court, there are handkerchiefs on the table and sometimes bags. And no one is sitting at that table. Even if there are many people, none of the customers will try to sit in the seat. Why is that? A Japan person may put down their luggage when securing their seat. I once heard from a student that he was surprised to see someone leave a bag containing valuables as it is. You may not notice that there are handkerchiefs etc., so you may get into trouble if you sit down by mistake. Check before you sit down. Children who go to school alone: Be careful not to talk to them! Once, a student wrote an essay in which he was surprised to see a small child walking alone with a large load on his back. Many elementary school students in Japan go to school alone. In some cases, children as young as 6 years old take the train alone to school. Some international students like children and will ask a child walking alone with good intentions, such as "Is it okay to be alone?" or "You're cute," but the police may be notified, so even if there is a child walking alone, just watch over them quietly. Can I get this vegetable? : Unmanned sale of vegetables In the fields of Japan sometimes there are small huts where vegetables are sold. When you pay, put money in a box located inside the shed. When the international students saw the hut for the first time, they were impressed by the money box outside. Many students use unmanned sales points because they are cheaper than buying them at the supermarket and you can get fresh vegetables. In addition, some students may mistakenly think that they can get vegetables discarded in the field or nuts from trees in the park, and the police may catch them. All the plants that are grown outside have their owners, so please don't take them. As much as twice a day! International Students and Job Questions A job question is when a police officer stops someone on the street who he thinks is suspicious and asks them a question. This job question often helps prevent crime before it happens. International students are often asked about their duties, especially male students, which can be taken twice a day. In the job question, you will be asked if you are carrying a residence card and where the school is. Even when you go to a convenience store in your neighborhood, be sure to bring your residence card with you. How was it? Even Japan are considered safe, of course there is a risk of getting involved in crime. Please be careful not to feel too safe while studying abroad. By the way, at our school, when you enter the school, you go to greet the neighborhood police box and participate in local events and volunteer activities so that the people of the city can remember your face. Building good relationships with your neighbors is necessary for a smooth study abroad life. When you come to Japan, greet the people you see every day cheerfully.
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