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COOL JAPAN VIDEOS Photo Contest PR
Dec. 14, 2022
Introducing the photos posted on "Minna no Post"! This is a pickup post on the inbound tourism information SNS "COOL JAPAN VIDEOS". Today, I would like to introduce Taketaro's post "Tsumagojuku in Nagano Prefecture". It is an impressive photo of a traditional Japanese house illuminated by the shining light. Located in Nagiso Town, Kiso District, Nagano Prefecture, Tsumago-juku is one of the five highways built in the Edo period. While the traditional townscape disappeared with the passage of time, we succeeded in preserving the old townscape for the first time in Japan. In recognition of these efforts, it was 1976 (Showa 51) selected as an Important Preservation District for Groups of Traditional Buildings. The Terashita area, where the townscape preservation activities were first carried out, can be said to be the origin of Tsumago-juku. Wakihonjin Okutani, which has a hearth and allows you to experience the atmosphere of that time, was designated as an important cultural property of the country in 2001 (Heisei 13). From November to February, you can see a fantastic sight of light pouring down from the lattice. Tsumago-juku has plenty of accommodation. "Onjuku Daikichi" is a guest house that harmonizes tradition and modernity. You can enjoy hinoki baths, Daikichi original dishes, chirashi soba sushi, ancient rice rice, etc. Located along the Nakasendō, Hanaya is a convenient ryokan with a large public bath and a private shower room, making it a popular ryokan for overseas tourists. Typical gourmet foods around Tsumago-juku are soba noodles and gohei mochi. We recommend Gohei mochi made with buckwheat flour from "Restaurant Kongoya" and Gohei mochi with sauce made with local mountain gurumi from "Shinya". At the restaurant "Otoyoshi" and the ryokan "Fujioto", you can taste local cuisine. ◆Tsumago-juku◆ 【Access】 From JR Nagiso Station Bus about 10 minutes / Taxi about 10 minutes Nagiso Town Regional Bus Timetable (using Magome Line and Hojin Line) About regional buses and shared taxis (Nagiso Town Hall) About 40 minutes on foot (via Nakasendō or National Route 19/National Route 256 side road sidewalk)
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タケタロ
Oct. 16, 2020
Tsumago-juku in Nagano
It is recommended to go after noon in winter!
On a clear day, you can see a wonderful sight with light like this.
  • Life in Japan
  • Japanese heart/Wabisabi
  • Japan
  • Photo Contest
  • Great view
  • Sightseeing
  • Travel
  • Nagiso
  • Nagano Prefecture
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Mar. 28, 2022
[English/Japanese] Japanese law will change drastically from April, and those who come to Japan to study at the age of 18 need to be well informed about the new law. So what are the major changes? Do you know? (1) Change in the age of adulthood Until now, the age of adulthood in Japan has been 20. However, as of April 1, the age will change to 18. With the age of adulthood at 18, people will be able to sign contracts for apartments, credit cards, etc., which were previously only allowed at the age of 20. In addition, women used to be able to get married at the age of 16, but this age has also been changed to 18. (2) Things to be aware of Some things do not change when the age of adulthood turns 18. These are smoking, drinking and gambling. In Japan, the minimum age for smoking, drinking, and gambling is 20, but this age remains 20 even though the age of majority has changed. Even if you do not smoke or drink yourself, you cannot purchase Please be careful. The rush of foreign students entering Japan will start in April. International students should make sure to understand the rules of Japan. Japanese people, these are international students who have been waiting to study in Japan for up to two years. We would appreciate it if you could watch over them warmly. From April, the Japan law will change significantly. Those who come to Japan at the age of 18 should be familiar with the new law. So what's going to change drastically? Do you guys know? (1) Change of age of adulthood Until now, the age of majority in Japan was 20 years. But from April 1, they will change to 18 years old. Now that the age of adulthood is 18, you will be able to sign apartment contracts and credit card contracts that were previously only allowed from the age of 20. Also, until now, women could get married from the age of 16, but now they are also from the age of 18. (2) Things to be aware of Some things do not change even when the age of adulthood reaches 18 years. It can be smoking or drinking or gambling. In Japan, smoking, drinking and gambling are from the age of 20, but here it remains 20 years old even if the age of adulthood changes. Even if you don't smoke or drink, you can't buy it. Be careful. There is a rush of international students entering the country from April. International students should familiarize themselves with the rules of Japan. To all Japan of you, these are international students who have been waiting for up to two years to study abroad in Japan. I hope you will watch over me warmly.
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  • Japan
  • Life in Japan
  • Japanese-language school
  • Study abroad
  • International students
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Feb. 21, 2022
[English/Japanese] February 22 is "Cat Day" in Japan. In Japan, February 22 is "Cat Day", and there is a lot of excitement as people upload pictures of cats on social media. Do you like cats? Or do you prefer dogs? In this article, I would like to talk about the pet situation in Japan. 1) Cat boom In Japan, many people have always owned dogs, but in 2017, the number of cat owners surpassed the number of dog owners. The reason for this is that Japan is an aging society. Dogs have to be accompanied on walks, and elderly people who are worried about their physical strength tend to choose cats that don't need to be walked. Also, more and more people are keeping pets because they are spending more time at home due to the influence of Corona. I wonder if it's the same in your country? 2)Can international students have pets? Very few international students have pets. To own a dog, you have to pay several hundred thousand yen at a pet store and also have to get shots. In addition, most apartments in Japan do not allow pets. However, sometimes people keep hamsters, which are relatively cheap and do not have as long a life span as dogs and cats. I heard a story about a Japanese language school that had a problem with a student who suddenly decided to return to his home country and asked them to take in his turtle. Pets are life. It is important to keep them responsibly. 3) If you miss your pet... Some people who used to have pets in their home countries may become stressed out because they cannot interact with their pets during their long stay in Japan. Recently in Japan, there has been an increase in the number of cafes with cats and dogs, where you can casually interact with cats and dogs for just a fee and a drink. In addition to cats and dogs, some of these animal cafes also have birds and reptiles. Please try to use them. Our school does not allow pets in the dormitories. However, there are cat cafes and dog cafes around the school. There is also a zoo just a few stops away from the school. If you are an animal lover, I think you will enjoy your study abroad experience at our school. February 22 is "Cat Day" in Japan. At general stores, products with pictures of cats are on sale, and people are excited to upload them on SNS. Do you like cats? Or do you like dogs? This time, I will talk about the pet situation in Japan. (1) Cat boom Many people have been dog owners in Japan for a long time, but in 2017, the number of cats bred exceeded the number of dogs. The reason is that the Japan is aging. Dogs have to keep up with walks, so elderly people who are worried about their physical strength tend to choose cats that do not need to be walked. In addition, due to the influence of Corona, the time spent at home has increased, so the number of people who have pets is increasing. Is it the same in your country? (2) Can international students have pets? Very few international students have pets. In order to get a dog, you have to pay hundreds of thousands of yen at the pet store and also give injections. In addition, most Japan apartments prohibit keeping pets. However, sometimes there are people who get "hamsters" that are relatively cheap and their lifespan is not as long as that of dogs and cats. At one Japanese school, I heard that a student who was suddenly returning to Japan asked me to take a turtle and had a problem. Pets are life. Be sure to keep them responsibly. (3) If you miss your pet... Some people who had pets in their home countries cannot interact with pets during their long study abroad life, which can be stressful. In Japan, the number of cafes with cats and dogs has been increasing recently, and you can easily interact with cats and dogs with only the usage fee and drink fee. In addition, some cafes where you can interact with these animals sell not only cats and dogs, but also birds and reptiles. Please take advantage of it. Pets are prohibited in the dormitory. However, there are cat cafes and dog cafes around the school. The zoo is also a few stops from the school. I think animal lovers can enjoy studying abroad at our school.
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  • Japan
  • Japanese-language school
  • Life in Japan
  • Cat
  • Dogs
  • International students
  • Study abroad
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Feb. 15, 2022
[English/Japanese] Currently, most people are wearing masks due to the coronavirus, but since there have always been so many people in Japan wearing masks from February to April, all foreign tourists are surprised. The reason why they wear masks is "hay fever". Especially at this time of the year, people who are allergic to cedar are wearing masks. Many foreign students are suffering from hay fever. In this article, I would like to tell you about this hay fever. 1) One out of three international students has hay fever? According to some data, one out of every three international students will develop hay fever for the first time after coming to Japan. Also, the number of international students who develop hay fever in their third year in Japan is the highest, followed by those in their first year. International students may misunderstand that they have a prolonged cold at first because there are no hay fever sufferers around them in their country and they do not know what hay fever is like. Unlike a cold, hay fever has strong symptoms of runny nose, itchy eyes, and an itchy nose. If you have any idea what it is, please consult with your school teacher first. 2)Hay fever prevention goods So how do Japanese people get over the hay fever season? Most people take medicines prescribed by hospitals or over-the-counter medicines. In addition to medicines, there are many other goods that are sold on the streets to alleviate the symptoms of hay fever. For example, glasses for hay fever and high quality tissues that do not damage the nose. Sales of air purifiers also increase during this season. For those who don't have the money or the time to go to the hospital, there is a life hack that says applying Vaseline to the entrance of the nose can reduce the symptoms. Also, lack of sleep and alcohol consumption are said to worsen hay fever symptoms. Take care to delay your healthy lifestyle. ★Extras In Tokyo, one out of two people is said to have hay fever. The topic of hay fever is also an opportunity to get to know Japanese people. It is said that when a person who has never had hay fever before gets hay fever, the person who has had hay fever for many years will say "Welcome ☺". I urge you to talk to them! Currently, most people wear masks due to the influence of the coronavirus, but in Japan, there are so many people who wear masks from February to April that all foreign tourists are surprised. The reason why I wear a mask is "hay fever". Especially at this time of year, people with cedar allergies wear masks. Many international students suffer from hay fever. This time, I will tell you about this hay fever. (1) Is 1 in 3 international students with hay fever? According to some data, one in three international students develops hay fever only after coming to Japan. In addition, among international students who had hay fever, those who took it in their third year ranked first, followed by the first year. International students do not know what kind of symptoms hay fever is around in the country, so they may mistakenly think that they have a prolonged cold at first. Unlike colds, hay fever has strong symptoms of runny nose, itchy eyes and itchy nose. If you have any idea, please consult your school teacher first. (2) Hay fever countermeasure goods So how do Japan people get through the hay fever period? Almost everyone takes medications prescribed in hospitals and over-the-counter medications. In addition to medicines, goods that relieve the symptoms of hay fever are often sold in the city at this time. For example, glasses for hay fever and high-grade tissues that do not damage the nose. In addition, sales of air purifiers also increase during this period. For those who do not have money or do not have time to go to the hospital, there is also a life hack that says that applying petroleum jelly to the entrance to the nose will alleviate the symptoms. In addition, lack of sleep and alcohol consumption are said to worsen the symptoms of hay fever. Be careful not to delay your healthy life. Extra In Tokyo, it is said that one in two people has hay fever. The topic of hay fever is also a chance to make friends with Japan people. When a person who has not had hay fever before gets hay fever, it is said that people who have had hay fever for many years say "welcome ☺". Please talk to us!
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  • Japan
  • Life in Japan
  • Japanese-language school
  • International students
  • Study abroad
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Feb. 7, 2022
[English/Japanese] Snow is predicted to fall in Tokyo this week. In Japan, there are many tourist destinations where winter sports are popular, such as Hokkaido, but in Tokyo, snowfall is not that common and the city is not prepared to handle it. As a result, even a 5 cm accumulation of snow can cause many problems. In this article, I will tell you how to deal with snow in Tokyo. 1) Transportation When it snows, train schedules are often disrupted. Trains may be cancelled or the number of trains may be reduced, so you may be late for work. Try to leave your house early on snowy days. Roads can also be crowded, and few people buy snow tires for the rare snowfall in a year. As a result, many people drive with regular tires on snowy days, which can cause slip accidents. Try not to walk near cars on snowy days. 2) The day after it snows Unlike Hokkaido, the snow that falls in Tokyo has a high moisture content. Therefore, the day after a snowfall, the roads are often icy. Since there are many buildings in Tokyo, there is no sunlight and the snow may not melt even after a week. Some people slip on the icy roads and get seriously injured because of it. On the day after a snowfall, try to walk in the sunshine. 3)What to wear What you wear the next day is more important than what you wear when it is snowing. The roads are very slippery, so it is best to wear long boots or other non-slip shoes. You should also wear gloves because the ice can cut your hands if you slip and fall on them. A hat is also necessary to protect your head. A backpack or other bag that allows you to keep both hands free is also a good idea. If you don't have boots, there is a life hack to prevent slipping by putting an adhesive bandage on the back of your sneakers. Please give it a try. Many of the students at our school come from warm countries. Some of them have caught colds from playing in the snow because it was their first time to see snow. Please play in the snow in moderation. This time, we are planning to spread snow-melting agent in front of the dormitory. If your neighbors are having a hard time shoveling snow, let's help them out. It's also a chance to make friends with Japanese people. Also, it's best not to go outside too much on snowy days, so get your shopping done as soon as possible! Snow is forecast to fall in Tokyo this week. In Japan, there are many tourist spots where winter sports are popular, such as Hokkaido, but it does not snow that often in Tokyo, so the city of Tokyo is not equipped to cope with snow. Therefore, even if 5 cm of snow accumulates, various problems will occur. This time, I would like to tell you about snow countermeasures in Tokyo. (1) Transportation When it snows, train schedules are often disturbed. Trains may be suspended or the number of trains will be reduced, so you may be late for the company. Try to leave the house early on snowy days. Roads can also be crowded. Because of the snow that may or may not fall in a year, few people buy tires for snow. Therefore, many people drive on ordinary tires on snowy days, and some people have slip accidents. On snowy days, try not to walk near cars as much as possible. (2) The day after the snow fell Unlike Hokkaido, the snow that falls in Tokyo is moisture. Therefore, the roads are often icy the day after the snow falls. There are many buildings in Tokyo, so the sunlight may not shine and the snow may not melt even after one week. Some people slip on icy roads and get seriously injured because of it. The day after it snows, choose a path that gets as much sunlight as possible. (3) Clothing What you wear the next day is more important than when it's snowing. The road is very slippery, so wear shoes that are not slippery, such as long ones. Also, wear gloves as ice can cut your hands when you slip and get your hands. You will also need a hat to protect your head. Also, it is good to have a backpack or other bag that can be used with both hands. There is a life hack that people who do not have boots can put adhesive plasters on the back of their sneakers to prevent them from slipping. Give it a try. At our school, many students come from warm countries. Some people took off their shoes and played in the snow for the first time to see snow, catching a cold. Let's play in the snow in moderation. This time, we plan to sow snow melting agent in front of the dormitory. If your neighbors are having a hard time shoveling snow, help them. It's also a chance to get to know Japan people. Also, it's better not to go outside too much on snowy days, so be sure to finish your shopping early!
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  • Japan
  • Life in Japan
  • Japanese-language school
  • International students
  • Study abroad
  • Snow
  • Winter
  • Tokyo
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Jan. 24, 2022
[English] The Tokyo Metropolitan Government has decided to apply priority measures to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus since last week, and Tokyo residents will have to refrain from activities for about three weeks. Due to the new coronavirus, people have been spending more and more vacations at home as "stayhome" since 2020. How do Japanese people spend their vacations? Let's take a look at it along with Japanese culture. 1) Games Japanese games have become popular all over the world due to the Corona disaster. For example, games in which you build your own room or town and interact with your friends, or games in which you run and stretch like in a gym are especially popular. Also, games that used to be board games are now being played online, expanding the possibilities of games. With the recent establishment of high schools for e-sports (games as sports) in Japan, it is clear that games are becoming an important content for Japan. 2) Bath time Japanese people love to take a bath in the bathtub. Many of them go on trips to hot springs during long vacations, and those who have given up on their trips due to stay-home are said to buy various bath salts in order to feel a little like they are on vacation. As a result, some companies reportedly had record sales of bath salts last year. Do you use bath salts in your country? I hope you will try them when you come to Japan. 3) Plastic models Have you ever heard of plastic models? Plastic models are dolls made of plastic, and you can assemble and paint them yourself. In Japan, they have long been sold as children's toys, but since the Corona disaster, they have become popular not only among children but also among adults. In particular, plastic models of anime are very popular. If you are ever in Japan, you might want to buy one as a souvenir. Extras There is a character that has become famous in Corona. It is "Amabie. Amabie has been appearing in books for the past 150 years as a monster that eliminates plague. Before the corona virus, Amabie was a character known only to a few people who liked yokai, but after the corona virus spread, his recognition increased mainly through social networking sites, and now he is recognized by most of the people in Japan. In the city, you can see many products with Amabie's picture on them. Please try to look for them. Our school also offers online classes. In addition to classes, we also offer online yoga, online origami classes, and other fun activities. If you are interested, please contact us and we will explain the school via zoom. Please feel free to contact us. The Tokyo Metropolitan Government decided to apply priority measures to prevent the spread of the new coronavirus from last week, and Tokyo residents have decided to refrain from activities for about three weeks. Due to the influence of the new coronavirus, since 2020, I have been spending more of my days off at home as "Stay Home". How do Japanese people spend their days off? Let's take a look at it together with Japanese culture. (1) Games Japanese games became popular worldwide in Coronavirus pandemic. For example, creating your own room or city to socialize with friends, or running like a gym or stretching game are especially popular. In addition, what used to be a board game is now being played online, and games are expanding various possibilities. In Japan, high schools for e-sports (which consider games as sports competitions) have recently been established, indicating that games have become an important content for Japan. (2) Bath time Japanese people like to take a bath. Also, during long vacations, many people go on trips to take a dip in hot springs. It seems that people who have given up traveling at Stayhome buy various bath salts to enjoy the feeling of traveling as much as possible. As a result, some companies had record sales of bath salts last year. Do you have bath salts in your country? Please give it a try when you come to Japan. (3) Plastic model Do you know plastic models? Plastic models are dolls made of plastic, which you can assemble or color yourself. In Japan, it has been sold as a children's toy for a long time, but since its Coronavirus pandemic, it has become popular not only with children but also with adults. In particular, anime plastic models are popular. If you can come to Japan, you may want to buy it as a souvenir. Extra Edition There is a character who became famous in Corona. It is "Amabie". "Amabie" has been appearing in books for 150 years as a yokai that eliminates plagues. Before the coronavirus epidemic, the character was only used by a few yokai lovers, but since the coronavirus spread, it has become more recognized mainly on SNS, and is now recognized by most of the public. In the city, you can see many products with pictures of Amabie. Please look for it. We also offer online classes. In addition to classes, we also offer online yoga and online origami classes. If you are interested, please contact us and we will explain the school via Zoom.
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  • Life in Japan
  • Coronavirus
  • Games
  • Hot springs
  • Plastic Model
  • Japan
  • Japanese-language school
  • International students
  • Study abroad
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Jan. 17, 2022
[Englsih/Japanese] esterday, 27 years have passed since the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake. 6,434 people died in this earthquake. Also, over the weekend, there was a massive volcanic eruption in Tonga and there are reports of tsunami damage. Last summer, many people from Tonga visited our school's Facebook page. We sincerely hope that everyone is safe. Japan is famous in the world as a country with many earthquakes. For this reason, schools and companies conduct disaster drills on a regular basis. Today I would like to tell you about the disaster drills held at schools. Number of times held Schools with small children hold disaster drills every month, high school students hold drills four times a year, and companies hold drills twice a year. We mainly learn how to escape from earthquakes and fires. Earthquake drills The school broadcasts a message that an earthquake has occurred. Students immediately go under their desks, hold the legs of their desks, and wait until the shaking stops. When the shaking stops, students will follow the teacher's instructions to evacuate to a large area near the school (school grounds or park). The students will also learn what to be careful of during the evacuation process in advance. The catchphrase to watch out for is "O ka shi mo". (This catchphrase may vary from region to region.) ・ "O" →[Osanai] "Don't push" When escaping, try not to push people. ・ "Ka" = [Kakenai] "Don't run." When running away, act calmly because running is dangerous. ・"Shi"→[Syaberanai] "Don't talk." Don't miss important information. ・"Mo"→[Modoranai] "Don't go back" Don't go back to dangerous places even if you have forgotten something. 3) Firefighting training, AED training, first aid practice During the evacuation drills, students take various classes at the same time. For example, how to use a fire extinguisher and AED, and how to perform first aid. In some areas of Japan, there are facilities called "Bousai-kan" where you can learn about disaster prevention, and you can visit them all year round. 4) Evacuation goods In Japan, where disasters occur frequently, it is customary to prepare in advance what is needed in case of a disaster. In Japan, where disasters occur frequently, it is customary to prepare in advance what you will need in the event of a disaster, including a three-day supply of food, water, blankets, helmets, and flashlights. These items are sold at home centers as disaster prevention goods. For international students, the school may buy them with the school's reserve fund. Please check with your school for details. International students do not have to worry too much because evacuation drills are held at school. However, this is not the case for foreign tourists. If you are a foreign tourist, you may be worried about how to move if the disaster strikes. For those people, there is an app for foreign visitors to Japan. Please download it when you come to Japan. Yesterday marked the 27th anniversary of the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake. 6,434 people died in the earthquake. There was also a large eruption in Tonga over the weekend, and tsunami damage has been reported. Last summer, many people from Tonga visited our Facebook page. We sincerely pray for your safety. Japan is famous in the world as a country with many earthquakes. For this reason, schools and companies regularly conduct disaster prevention drills. Today, I would like to tell you about the disaster prevention drills held at the school. (1) Number of implementations Schools with small children conduct disaster drills every month, high school students four times a year, and companies hold disaster drills about twice a year. You will mainly learn about how to escape earthquakes and fires. (2) Earthquake drill The school broadcast says that an earthquake has occurred. Students quickly get under the desk, hold the desk legs, and wait until the shaking subsides. When the shaking subsides, follow the teacher's instructions and evacuate to a large area near the school (school grounds or parks). In addition, you will learn what to be careful about when evacuating in the pre-class. What you should be careful of is the catchphrase "Oh, ka, shi, mo". (This tagline varies by region.) ) "O" → "Don't push" When you run away, don't push people. "Ka" → "Don't run" When you run away, it is dangerous to run, so act calmly. Don't miss important information → "don't speak" Even if there is something forgotten that "also" → "will not return", do not return to a dangerous place. (3) Fire extinguishing training, AED training, first aid practice During evacuation drills, students take various courses at the same time. For example, how to use a fire extinguisher or AED or how to provide first aid. In some areas, Japan there is a facility called the "Disaster Prevention Hall" where you can learn about disaster prevention, which you can visit all year round. (4) Evacuation goods In Japan where disasters are frequent, it is customary to prepare in advance what is necessary in the event of a disaster. The contents include "food, water, blankets, helmets, and flashlights for three days." These items are sold as disaster prevention goods at home centers. International students may be purchased by the school with the school's reserve. Please check with your school. International students don't have to worry much because evacuation drills are conducted at school. However, this is not the case for foreign tourists. You may be worried about how to move if you are affected by a disaster. There is an app for foreigners visiting Japan for such people. Please download it when you come to Japan.
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  • Disaster
  • Life in Japan
  • Japan
  • Japanese-language school
  • International students
  • Study abroad
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Jan. 10, 2022
[English/Japanese] Last year was a difficult year for international students who are looking forward to studying in Japan. Fingers crossed that I can enter the country this year! In this article, I would like to introduce the measures we take in Japan to prevent coronas in stores. (1) What to do at the entrance At the entrance of a store, there is a thermometer and disinfectant. Some of these are done by shopkeepers for customers, and some are done automatically. Also, there is a sign posted that says "Masks strictly prohibited" and you cannot enter the store without wearing a mask. In the case of public facilities such as museums, you may be asked to fill in your name and address. (2) What to do in a restaurant More and more restaurants are reducing the number of seats in their establishments. Each seat is separated by a transparent plastic sheet, and there are posters warning people to wear masks except when eating. The system used to be to order from a menu list, but recently more and more restaurants have tablets at each table, and you can order from the tablet. In some restaurants, you can even get a mask case as a service. In addition, there is a ventilation time every few tens of minutes, where the staff calls out to the customers to open the windows and doors of the restaurant. In winter, the ventilation time can be a bit chilly, so wear warm clothes even inside the store. (3) What to do when you leave the store When standing in line at the cash register, there are markers on the floor to help you keep your social distance. Make sure to line up along them. In order to prevent infection, more and more stores are starting to accept cashless payments. In some cases, there are campaigns that offer points for cashless payment, so please take advantage of them. Our school is also taking measures against coronas. We disinfect thoroughly and take care of students' physical condition. Even if you are infected with corona, we can support you because our dormitory is located on the third floor of the school building. We are looking forward to welcoming international students to our country. Last year was a difficult year for international students who are looking forward to studying abroad Japan. I pray that I will be able to enter the country this year! This time, I will introduce corona countermeasures at stores that are in Japan. (1) What to do at the entrance There is a thermometer and disinfectant at the entrance of the shop. There are those that the shop staff makes to the customer and those that are done automatically. In addition, there is a sticker that says "Masks strictly prohibited", and you cannot enter the store unless you wear a mask. In the case of public facilities such as museums, you may be asked to fill in your name and address. (2) What to do in the store The number of restaurants and other establishments has been reduced. Each seat is separated by a transparent plastic sheet, and there is a poster warning you to wear a mask except when eating. Until now, it was a system to place orders by looking at the menu table, but recently there are tablets placed on each table, and the number of restaurants where you can order from tablets has increased. Depending on the store, you may be able to get a mask case at the service. In addition, there is a ventilation time several tens of minutes, and the clerk calls out to the customer and opens the windows and doors of the store. In winter, ventilation time can get a little cold, so wear warm clothes in the store. (3) What to do when leaving the store When you go to the cash register, there are landmarks on the floor to observe social distancing. Try to line up along with it. In addition, an increasing number of stores are starting cashless payments that do not transfer money to prevent infection. In the case of cashless payment, there may be campaigns that offer benefits such as points, so please take advantage of it. Our school is also taking measures against corona. We carry out thorough disinfection and physical condition management of students. Even if you are infected with Corona, we can support you because the dormitory is located on the third floor of the school building. We are looking forward to the entry of international students.
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  • Japan
  • Japanese-language school
  • Life in Japan
  • Study abroad
  • International students
  • Coronavirus
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Jan. 3, 2022
[English/Japanese] Happy New Year to you all! I hope to see you again this year. In Japan, the new year begins on January 1st. What do you do at the beginning of a new year in your country? This time, I would like to introduce the Japanese New Year. 1) Nengajo(New Year's card) A letter sent between January 1 and January 7 to wish someone a happy new year is called a nengajo. Recently, many people have been using social networking services instead of letters. Also, New Year's greeting cards cannot be sent to family members or relatives who have passed away in the previous year. Please be careful with this. 2) Hatsuhinode(First sunrise) The sunrise on the first day of the year is called the "first sunrise" and is considered to be a very good omen. Did you see it? 3) Hatsumode(First visit to a shrine) A New Year's visit to a shrine to pray for the safety of the year is called "Hatsumode". At Hatsumode, people draw omikuji (fortunes) to tell their fortune for the year and buy good luck charms. 4) Otoshidama(New Year's gift) Onyedama is money that children can receive on New Year's Day. It is a fun event for children. 5) Osechi cuisine Osechi-ryori is a New Year's feast. Each of these treats has its own meaning. For example, prawns have a meaning of "long life" because of their bent waist. Also, yellow food is believed to bring good luck with money. This is eaten from January 1st to the 3rd, which also means that you don't have to do any housework for the three days of the New Year. 6) Hstuyume(First dream) What kind of dream did you have at the beginning of the year? In Japan, it is said to be good luck to dream of "Mt. May this year be a wonderful one for all of you! Happy New Year! We look forward to working with you again this year. The new year begins on January 1 for Japan. What do you do at the start of a new year in your country? This time, I would like to introduce the New Year of Japan. (1) New Year's card Letters sent between January 1 and January 7 to convey New Year's wishes are called "Nengajo". Recently, more and more people are doing it on SNS instead of letters. In addition, New Year's cards cannot be sent to people who have lost their family or relatives in the previous year. Please be careful. (2) First sunrise The sun that rises on January 1 is called the "first sunrise." This first sunrise is considered very auspicious. Have you seen it? (3) First visit Visiting a shrine to pray for the safety of the year on New Year's Day is called "first visit". At the first visit, you draw fortunes to predict the fortune of the year and buy amulets. (4) New Year's Ball New Year's money is money that children can receive on New Year's Day. It can be said that it is a fun event for children. (5) Osechi cuisine Osechi ryori is a feast eaten on New Year's Day. Each of these treats has its own meaning. For example, shrimp have a bent waist, which means "you can live a long life". In addition, yellow food is said to increase fortune. This is something to eat from January 1 to 3, and there is also the point that you do not have to do housework for three days on New Year's Day. (6) First dream What dreams did you have at the beginning of the year? In Japan, dreaming of "Mt. Fuji", "Falcon" and "Eggplant" is considered auspicious. May this be a wonderful year for all of you!
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  • Japan
  • Traditional Japanese Food
  • Japanese heart/Wabisabi
  • Life in Japan
  • Japanese-language school
  • Japanese New Years
  • Hatsumode
  • First sunrise of the year
  • International students
開智国際日本語学校(Kaichi International School of Japanese)
Dec. 20, 2021
[English/Japanese] In this issue, I will continue to introduce some of the things that were popular in Japan this year. 1)Showa/Heisei Retro Boom This year, things that were popular in the Showa (1926-1989) and Heisei (1989-2019) eras are booming again. Mainly, old townscapes and tableware from the 1960s, characters and accessories that were popular in the 1980s and 1990s became popular among the younger generation as "new things. For the young generation that has had digital things since birth, they feel that retro things are incomplete and warm. An amusement park in Saitama Prefecture reopened this year, recreating the streets of the 1960s, and it is bustling with visitors every day. You may feel as if you have gone back in time. 2) Oatmeal Oatmeal sales have boomed this year, even doubling from the previous year. The reason seems to be that more and more people are eating at home due to the new coronavirus, and easy and healthy meals have become more preferred. Japanese people are famous for their culture of eating rice, but recently more and more people are eating staple foods other than rice, such as oatmeal and bread. Rice takes a long time to cook after it is washed. Busy Japanese may have come to prefer something more easily eaten. 3) Imperial Family News This year, the Emperor's niece got married, and various news during the engagement period were broadcasted on TV every day. News about the Imperial Family mainly interests the older generation, but the news about the marriage attracted the interest of various age groups. Did you find out what was popular this year? At our school, we sometimes have students research and present what is popular in the classroom. It's a great way to learn more about Japanese culture. This time, as in the previous article, we will introduce some of the things that were popular in this Japan. (1) Showa-Heisei retro boom This year, what was popular in Showa (1926 ~ 1989) and Heisei (1989 ~ 2019) has re-boomed. Mainly, old townscapes and tableware from the 1960s, characters and accessories that were popular in the 1980s ~ 1990s became popular among the younger generation as "new things". For the younger generation, who have been digital since birth, they feel that retro things are incomplete and warm. An amusement park in Saitama Prefecture was reopened this year, but it reproduces the cityscape of the 1960s and is crowded every day. You may be able to experience going back in time. (2) Oatmeal This year, there was such a boom that sales of oatmeal doubled from the previous year. The reason seems to be that more people are eating at home due to the influence of the new coronavirus, and easy and healthy eating has become more preferred. Japan people are famous for their culture of eating rice, but recently the number of people who eat staple foods other than rice, such as oatmeal and bread, has increased. It takes a long time for rice to be cooked after washing. Maybe Japan busy people have come to prefer things that are easier to eat. (3) Imperial Family News This year, His Majesty the Emperor's niece got married, and various news during the engagement period was broadcast on TV almost every day. While the news of the imperial family is mainly of interest to older people, the news about this marriage attracted the attention of various age groups. Did you see what was popular this year? At our school, students may research and present what is popular in class. You can learn more about Japan culture.
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  • Showa Retro
  • Imperial family
  • Breakfast
  • Life in Japan
  • Japan
  • Japanese-language school
  • International students
  • Study abroad
Dylan Gibson
Dec. 20, 2021
Was shopping the other day in Nihonbashi and saw this akabeko and thought it was really cute so I decided to take a photo of it. The name was quite funny to me as well. Instead of the usual "akabeko" this was a "nemubeko," or "tired-beko" basically, and you can see how the eyes are actually half way shut instead of the normally wide-open eyes, giving it the tired look lol. I've always wanted to try an akabeko experience as I love traditional Japanese crafts and akabeko in particular seem really fun to make. I've read a few posts in another places of people trying akabeko workshops and having a really fun time. I haven't used papier mache since I was a kid either so it'd probably be a nostalgic experience for sure. If I do try an akabeko workshop, I think I'll make a "nemubeko" as well lol
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  • Japan
  • Shopping
  • Tokyo
  • Traditional culture
  • Traditional crafts
  • Fukushima Prefecture
  • Experiences
  • Life in Japan

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